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2016-2017 CATALOG
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2016-2017 CATALOG

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2855 Rolling Pin Lane, Suite 110
Suwanee, GA 30024
(T) 770-831-8882 (F) 770-831-8858
hudsontayloruniversity.org
HUDSON
TAYLOR
UNIVERSITY

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This catalog is created to inform the students, faculty, administration, and the public at large
about what they should know about Hudson Taylor University: our mission, who we are and
what we believe in, what we teach, and the policies and rules that guide our actions.
The State of Georgia authorized Hudson Taylor University to operate as a postsecondary
educational institution pursuant to the Nonpublic Postsecondary Educational Institutions Act
of 1990. All the state laws and educational standards that govern our university can be found
in the statutory text of the Act (See http://gnpec.org/about-gnpec/law).
Hudson Taylor University is also a recognized applicant member with the Association for
Biblical Higher Education (ABHE) and is pursuing the candidate status followed by full
accreditation (See ttps://www.abhe.org/directories/member-colleges/).
As a Christ-centered institution we strive to be honest and transparent in our presentation of
data and information about us. Any errors that may exist in this catalog are unintentional and
will be corrected in an Erratum upon discovery. This catalog is for your use and convenience.
We welcome your suggestions for improvement and change.
2016-2017 CATALOG

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I extend my warmest welcome and greetings to all students,
parents, faculty, administrators and friends of Hudson Taylor
University.
Hudson Taylor University is a faithful manifestation of God’s
calling. We are committed to educating ministers and
missionaries to carry the Gospel of Jesus Christ to the far ends
of the earth as well as tending to those around us (Acts 1:8).
We are a young and fast growing learning institution embracing
diversity of cultures, nationalities and various denominational
points of view. Here at Hudson Taylor we believe that kindling
in the minds of our students’ profound and unalloyed love of
God, humankind and our environment is just as or even more
important than teaching tangible skills in ministry and
knowledge of the Bible. We want to inspire our students to
be compassionate global leaders and intrepid trailblazers as
missionaries.
Hudson Taylor University pledges all its effort to bringing the
most up-to-date scholarship, culturally relevant experience and
practical expertise about the world affairs to our classrooms.
I am truly honored to be part of the community of faculty
members, administrators and students who together represent
a close knit kinship at Hudson Taylor. Please consider each one
of us as a resource for higher learning, a companion in ministry
and missions, and lifetime brother and sister in Christ.
In His Grace,
Richard S. Yoon, Esq., J.D.
Founder/President
WELCOME FROM PRESIDENT
Welcome From The PresidenT

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It is my distinct honor to welcome you to Hudson Taylor
University. As a chairperson to the Board of Directors of Hudson
Taylor University, I want to share with you our love of and dedication
to the University and its success. The Board is committed to recruiting
the best available faculty and providing for the continued financial
stability of Hudson Taylor University.We are a fledgling university,
but we are, nonetheless, striving to attract the most culturally
diverse and experienced professional Christian leaders to our
Board. At present we are small, but in the future the Lord will use us
to prepare future workers for His Kingdom. (Isaiah 60:22).
While we should strive to be financially stable, the measure of our
success should never be predicted by any increasing number of
students, faculty or the size of our endowment. Hudson Taylor should be measured by the how much
our students will radiate Christ’s love, and how far they are willing to take the Gospel of Christ. (Acts 1:8).
I pledge my commitment to managing and overseeing the University to making sure that Hudson
Taylor will always strive to glorify God, serve Christ in the furtherance of His Kingdom.
In Christ,
Linda Park
Chairperson
Board of Directors
Hudson Taylor University
Message from the Board Chairperson
MESSAGE FROM THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS CHAIR

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HTU Catalog 2016-2017
CONTENTS
GenerAL infOrmATiOn
1.1. UniversiTy PrOfiLe
MISSION STATEMENT
INSTITUTIONAL GOALS
ETHICAL STANDARDS
HISTORy
LOCATION
FACILITIES
RECOGNITION AND AFFILIATION
1.2. AdmissiOns infOrmATiOn
GENERAL ADMISSIONS POLICIES
STATEMENT OF NON-DISCRIMINATION
TRANSFER STUDENTS AND TRANSFER OF CREDITS
1.3. finAnCiAL infOrmATiOn
GENERAL FEE
PAyMENT
TUITION AND FEES
REFUNDS
SCHOLARSHIPS
1.4. sTUdenT Life
STUDENT GOvERNMENT ASSOCIATION (SGA)
DRUG-FREE CAMPUS
SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICy
WEAPONS
1.5. CHAPeL POLiCies
CHAPEL SERvICES
CHAPEL ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS
POLICy vIOLATIONS
COMMENCEMENT CHAPEL AND CEREMONy
8
9
9
10
10
12
14
15
17
19
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21
22
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25
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26
27
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CONTENTS

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1.6. CHrisTiAn serviCe PrOGrAm
1.7. HeALTH CAre POLiCy
1.8. sTUdenTs WiTH disABiLiTies
POLICy ON REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS
1.9. ACAdemiC inTeGriTy And misCOndUCT
1.10. GrievAnCe POLiCy
1.11. ACAdemiC infOrmATiOn
REGISTRATION
GRADING SCALE
ACADEMIC ASSESSMENT SySTEM
ATTENDANCE POLICy
WITHDRAWAL OR LEAvE OF ABSENCE
ACADEMIC WARNING, PROBATION, AND DISMISSAL OR TERMINATION
PERMANENT ACADEMIC RECORD
GENERAL GRADUATION POLICy
UnderGrAdUATe PrOGrAms
BACHeLOr Of ArTs in BiBLiCAL sTUdies (BABs)
UnderGrAdUATe COUrse desCriPTiOns
GrAdUATe PrOGrAms
mAsTer Of ArTs in THeOLOGiCAL sTUdies (mATs)
mAsTer Of diviniTy (m.div)
GrAdUATe COUrse desCriPTiOns
UniversiTy PersOnneL
BOArd Of direCTOrs
AdminisTrATive PersOnneL
fACULTy
referenCe infOrmATiOn
ACAdemiC CALendAr 2016-2017
index
CONTENTS
30
34
35
35
36
38
39
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40
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41
41
42
43
43
44
45
54
73
74
81
92
112
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114
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120

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GenerAL infOrmATiOn
1.1. UNIVERSITY PROFILE
1.2. ADMISSIONS INFORMATION
1.3. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
1.4. STUDENT LIFE
1.5. CHAPEL POLICIES
1.6. CHRISTIAN SERVICE PROGRAM
1.7. HEALTH CARE POLICY
1.8. STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
1.9. ACADEMIC INTEGRITY AND
MISCONDUCT
1.10. GRIEVANCE POLICY
1.11. ACADEMIC INFORMATION

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1.1.1. missiOn sTATemenT
GENERAL INFORMATION
1.1. UNIVERSITY PROFILE
UNIVERSITY PROFILE

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1.1.3. eTHiCAL sTAndArds
Hudson Taylor University shall always strive to glorify and love God in all its endeavors. In
furtherance of our stated Mission and Institutional Goals, the Board of Directors of Hudson
Taylor University has resolved to adopt the following Ethical Standards which shall be
applicable and adhered to by all member of the University including all full-time and
part-time employees, faculty, officers, administrators and the Board of Directors.
standard 1. Honesty
Hudson Taylor University recognizes that God is the ultimate judge of our intentions and
actions. Worldly reputation and temporal recognition are merely derivative of our earnest
prayer to be judged by God with mercy and love. Therefore, every member of the
University shall always be honest in our intentions and actions toward ourselves, students
and all those we come to communicate. All records and data shall be created and
maintained honestly and with the highest level of integrity and competence by the
University.
UNIVERSITY PROFILE
To foster development of Christian leaders who will deliver the Gospel of Christ
throughout the world as ministers and missionaries.
To provide unsurpassed Christ-centered learning experience led by world-class faculty
and enhanced by culturally diverse student body.
To network, partner with and engage churches, citizens and institutions which are local or
global to cooperate in the building of His Kingdom.
To become a model for an efficiently managed and financially ethical Christ-centered
University where students grow to love and serve God, fellow men and women in
furtherance of His Kingdom.
1.1.2. insTiTUTiOnAL GOALs
HuDSOn TAYLOR SEEkS:
1
2
3
4

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standard 2. mercy
Hudson Taylor University recognizes that we are all sinners whose lives are redeemed solely
by God’s Mercy and Christ’s blood. Every member of the University shall always look toward
ourselves and those around us with merciful demeanor and spiritually prepared to forgive
others as God had forgiven us.
standard 3. financial responsibility and Transparency
Hudson Taylor University recognizes that all material and financial resource are given to us
by God’s Providence and Grace. Therefore, every member of the University shall always be
transparent in handling matters of finance and the use of University resources.
standard 4. Avoidance of Conflict of interest
Hudson Taylor University recognizes that our entire endeavor should solely lead to further
building of His Kingdom on Earth. Personal profit and advancement of individual gain must
be avoided in all affairs of the University. All potential conflict of interest and all issues that
may violate this Standard must be fully disclosed to the Board of Directors. The Board must
apply the strictest interpretation of the applicable State and Federal law in deciding matters
involving conflict of interest.
standard 5. Compliance with the Law
Hudson Taylor University recognizes that adherence to above Standards should lead to full
compliance with all Federal, State and local laws regarding the governance, operation and
financial filing requirements promulgated by government. Nonetheless, the University shall
strive to continually update its knowledge of the law and maintain the highest level of
compliance to the law.
standard 6. violation of ethical standards
Hudson Taylor University recognizes that we must be ever vigilant of violations of the Ethical
Standards set above. All violations must be reported to the office of the President initially as
a confidential communication and then reviewed and investigated by the Institutional/Legal
Compliance Committee. All final adjudication on the violation shall be made by the Board
of Directors upon recommendation by the Chair of the Institutional/Legal Compliance
Committee.
UNIVERSITY PROFILE

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1.1.4. HisTOry
Hudson Taylor University was founded in 2013.
The name of the university was inspired by its
namesake and the most preeminent mission-
ary to China, James Hudson Taylor. Hudson
Taylor was born in 1832 . In 1853 he took his
first trip to China, In his lifetime of 73 years,
he founded CIM (China Inland Mission) and
was responsible for the commissioning of over
800 missionaries, and the establishment of
125 schools in China. His mission was ground-
breaking in its embracing of all Protestant
denominations and worthy of emulation in its
respect of Chinese culture and customs. While
in China, he always wore Chinese clothes and
spoke their language.
Hudson Taylor University is a faithful manifes-
tation of God’s calling to bring the Gospel of
Christ to the ends of the earth (Acts 1:8). We are
profoundly inspired by Hudson Taylor’s lifelong
dedication to missions in China. We, therefore,
seek to educate and produce men and women who are called to carry on the missional work he started in
China as well as other parts of the world wherever they are called to serve.
The institutional origin of Hudson Taylor University traces back to Underwood University. The creation
of Underwood University was similarly inspired by the missional work of Horace Underwood. He was the
preeminent missionary to Korea who in his and his heirs’ lifetimes transformed Korea into a prolific
emissary of missionaries and a beacon of Christianity in East Asia. Underwood University, now a sister
university to Hudson Taylor, ceded its most important biblical programs to Hudson Taylor. For the foresee-
able future many of the resources of Underwood University will be provided to and shared with Hudson
Taylor University.
HISTORY AND THE INSPIRATIONAL ORIGINS
OF THE UNIVERSITY.
UNIVERSITY PROFILE

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Almost contemporaneously with the creation of
Hudson Taylor University, Hudson Taylor Ministries
was founded as its chapel, a vehicle of its mission-
al work, a center for ministerial development of its
faculty and students, and the ecumenical arm of the
University. Hudson Taylor Ministries holds its worship
service for the University students and faculty . It also
serves the community as a local church.
Hudson Taylor University is a not for profit corporation
formed in 2013 managed by its Board of Directors
(Linda Park, Chairperson) and operated by its chief
executive Richard S. yoon, Esq., J.D. It is conve-
niently located in Suwanee, Georgia, a northeast
suburb of Atlanta. The campus is comprised of two
buildings: the chapel, occupied by a Hudson Taylor
Ministries, and the 50,000 sq. ft. main building where
all the administration and faculty offices are located
together with the classrooms, student lounge,
auditorium and the library. Hudson Taylor Univer-
sity has been authorized by the Georgia Nonpublic
Postsecondary Education Commission in 2014 to
operate as a University in the State of Georgia.
Hudson Taylor in 1893
China Inland Mission missionaries in Chinese dress (1891).
*”China’s Spiritual Need and Claims+” by Hudson Taylor pub-
lished, October 1865 in London
UNIVERSITY PROFILE

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1.1.5. LOCATiOn
Hudson Taylor University Campus
Suwanee, Georgia
The following site is approved as Hudson Taylor University campus by GNPEC;
2855 Rolling Pin Lane, Suite 110, Suwanee, Georgia 30024
Located on Interstate 85, the city of Suwanee is conveniently located. It is close to the North
Georgia Mountains, Lake Lanier, and downtown cultural amenities. Suwanee is also 40 min-
utes north of Hartsfield –Jackson International Airport. Suwanee has both big-city vibrancy
and a small-town feel. Suwanee is considered one of the most desirable places to live in the
Atlanta region and has been named by several national publications (Money, Family Circle,
Kiplinger.com) as one of the best places to live and raise families.
The city of Suwanee is located in Gwinnett County, whose school system is widely regarded
as the best in the state. The district has twice won the National Board Prize, which rewards
districts that improve achievement levels of disadvantaged students. Suwanee students at-
tend the best of the best as evidenced by high test scores and other school achievements.
UNIVERSITY PROFILE

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1.1.6. fACiLiTies
The campus is housed in a two building complex. The main building is 50,000 square feet,
and it houses the auditorium, seminar/event space, music recital room, IT/computer lab, art
studio, dance studio, library, student lounge, student study room, and classrooms of varying
sizes and capacity. These buildings are located on an ample 8.3 acre parcel of land, which
provides the school with approximately 400 parking spaces and a large field with green
grass and trees.
Hudson Taylor University Library is an integral component of Hudson Taylor University and is
guided by its mission statement. Hudson Taylor University Library exists to provide a wide
range of materials and services designed to enhance and advance the faculty members’ and
students’ personal Christian lives and their equipping for ministry and service, while providing
a good academic foundation in Biblical, professional, and general studies.
The goal of library service is to help students achieve success while in college and to
foster mastery of research skills for lifelong learning. It is understood that the library, by its
nature, supports academic programs by partnering with them to enhance student learning,
program development, faculty research, and other professional activities. The library is the
cornerstone of a successful college, because it provides access to a wealth of information and
offers support services that enable students, faculty, and staff to utilize and evaluate this
information.
The library’s collections and services continue to benefit from the enormous changes in
technology. The library’s goals reflect continued and enhanced use of technology to
improve the access to the collection, the quality of the collection, educational services, and
ease of use. The exponential growth in information combined with rapidly changing technol-
ogy has resulted in an information environment that is extremely complex. The goals focus on
resources and services to assist patrons in finding their way through this information maze.
LiBrAry serviCes
UNIVERSITY PROFILE

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<LOCATiOn, dAys & HOUrs Of OPerATiOn>
The library is located in the Main Building of Hudson Taylor University, 2855 Rolling Pin Lane,
Suwanee, GA 30024. At present, the hours of operation for the library are Monday through
Friday (9:00 AM through 5:00 PM). The hours of operation are reviewed by the Academic
Affairs Committee and changed when necessary.
<LiBrAry resOUrCes>
The library contains many different kinds of items available for use by all members of the
Hudson Taylor University community. Currently the library has approximately 8,086 items
including audio visual materials. The library has access to electronic databases from EBSCO.
These materials are available for patron use subject to the guidelines of the library outlined
elsewhere in this handbook.
<OnLine CATALOG>
A catalog of our library holdings as well as a tutorial for its use is available through the library
webpage as part of the Hudson Taylor University site (www.hudsontayloruniversity.org).
<inTerLiBrAry LOAn>
Every effort will be made to secure interlibrary loans for items requested by students. All
copyright laws of the United States government will be observed and obeyed. Students will
be responsible for all costs incurred with the interlibrary loan process and will be responsible
for any and all fines should any be applicable.
To apply for an interlibrary loan see the Director of Library Services or one of the assistants for
the proper forms. All required information must be supplied before the process of interlibrary
loan can begin.
<OTHer LiBrAries>
Geographically, Hudson Taylor University is located within easy driving distance of many pres-
tigious university libraries. While most libraries will not allow check-out privileges, many will
allow students to use their facilities. See the Director of Library Services for more information.
Students are encouraged to obtain library cards for their local libraries which will afford them
access to quality databases as well as a broad range of curricular resources.
UNIVERSITY PROFILE

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1.1.7. reCOGniTiOn And AffiLiATiOn
Applicant Status with the Association for Biblical Higher Education
“Hudson Taylor University holds applicant status with the Association for Biblical Higher
Education, 5850 T.G. Lee Blvd., Ste. 130, Orlando, FL 32822; 407.207.0808. Applicant status
is a pre-membership status granted to those institutions that meet the ABHE Conditions
of Eligibility and that possess such qualities as may provide a basis for achieving candidate
status within five years.”
Joint Program Partnership with America Evangelical University in Los Angeles, California
(an ABHE member)
UNIVERSITY PROFILE

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1.2.1. GenerAL AdmissiOns POLiCies
Hudson Taylor University (HUDSON TAyLOR) admits those who meet certain educational
qualifications. For undergraduate programs, successful applicants must have a diploma
from an accredited high school or successfully pass the General Education Development
(GED) test. Hudson Taylor accepts either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic
Aptitude Test (SAT). For non-native speakers of English, a result of the Test of English as a
Foreign Language (TOEFL) must be submitted directly to Hudson Taylor either electronically
or by mail. For the graduate program, successful applicants must have a conferred under-
graduate degree from a postsecondary educational institution or its equivalent. Their grade
point average must be at least 2.0 (on a 4.0 scale) from an undergraduate program.
The requirements for admission to Hudson Taylor University include both a definite knowl-
edge of Jesus Christ as the applicant’s personal savior, and a committed relationship with
Him. Therefore, every applicant will be evaluated on the basis of:
1.
Academic Records
2.
The assessment of references
3.
Personal salvation experience through faith in Jesus Christ
4.
Personal desire to attend Hudson Taylor University
5.
Commitment to live a lifestyle standard which prohibits consuming alcohol
(except for liturgical and medicinal purposes) and tobacco; and engaging in
homosexual, premarital, and extramarital sexual activity.
The following items are required for a review and evaluation of the application for
admission:
US $100.00 Application Fee (payable to Hudson Taylor University)
1.2. ADMISSIONS INFORMATION
Then you will call upon me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you.
You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart.
Jeremiah 29:12~13
ADMISSIONS INFORMA
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ADMISSIONS INFORMA
TION
Fully completed Application Form. Make sure you have read and signed the
Lifestyle Commitment section.
Two recent photos of Applicant (2 inches X 2 inches – US passport size)
Academic Credentials and Recommendation Letter
undergraduate Level
- A certified copy of a High School diploma or General Education Development
(GED)
- Official High School Transcript or GED Score
- Two Recommendation Letters: one from religious leader and the other from a
community leader
- An Essay (include #3 & #4 in Admissions Criteria)
Graduate Level
- Official Transcript(s) from postsecondary educational institution
- A certified copy of the applicant’s undergraduate degree
- Two Recommendation Letters: one from religious leader and the other from a
community leader
- An Essay (include #3 & #4 in Admissions Criteria)
Hudson Taylor University follows an open admissions policy for those who meet the educa-
tional and religious requirements. The decision to admit an applicant will be made regard-
less of race, color, gender, and handicap, or national or ethnic origin according to our
non-discriminatory policy.
The approved application stays valid for a year from the date of approval. Hudson Taylor
University reserves the right to refuse admission to any applicants who do not meet our
standards and criteria.
1.2.2. sTATemenT Of nOn-disCriminATiOn
Hudson Taylor University does not discriminate anyone on the basis of race, color, sex, age,
disability, religion, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, ad-
missions policies, scholarship programs, employment procedures, and all other school-ad-
ministered programs. Hudson Taylor University is a Christ-centered and Bible based ed-
ucational community and as such shall not discriminate anyone on the basis of religion
except to further its stated Mission, Institutional Goal or to maintain adherence to its Biblical
Foundations Statement and Ethical Standards.

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1.2.3. TrAnsfer sTUdenTs And TrAnsfer Of CrediTs
Students transferring from a recognized college or university must follow the general
application policies and procedures.
GenerAL CriTeriA fOr TrAnsfer
Accreditation status and faculty qualifications of the institution, as well as content
correspondence and instructional level of courses are considered.
CriTeriA fOr TrAnsfer frOm A COLLeGe THAT is nOT ACCrediTed Or
reCOGniZed
Evaluation of catalog
Authorization or official exemption of the college by the state
Evaluation of faculty credentials
Assessment of course content and level of instruction
TrAnsfer CrediTs
Students should not assume that credits will automatically or equivocally transfer to or from
any educational institution. Before enrolling as a student, potential Hudson Taylor University
students should familiarize themselves with the university’s policy on the transfer of credits,
including whether or not the university will accept any credits earned at another educational
institution.
Course credits with a minimum grade of “C” earned at other accredited colleges and
universities are accepted at full value to the extent that the courses are comparable to
Hudson Taylor University’s stated requirements. An official transcript from the institution
attended showing satisfactory course completion is required. Transfer hours are not
accepted into a non-degree program, or for courses that do not meet program
requirements.
ADMISSIONS INFORMA
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1.3. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
No student is eligible to register for classes, or receive an official document, such as a di-
ploma or transcript, until all outstanding balances with Hudson Taylor University are current
or paid in full. In addition, any student who has an outstanding financial balance will not be
recommended for placement until the matter has been resolved.
A nonrefundable general fee is charged to students during each semester of attendance.
This fee covers the student’s library usage fee, Student Government Association fee, online
and network access, campus use fee, and other administrative costs.
Students are required to pay their tuition and fees in full before they can register for classes.
If they fail to make their payment promptly, a late fee will be assessed.
The following payment options are currently available:
Cash: Please deliver cash payments in person to the Office of Business Affairs.
Checks: Personal checks or Cashier’s checks are accepted. Please make all checks
payable to Hudson Taylor University.
1.3.1. GenerAL fee
1.3.2. PAymenT
FINANCIAL INFORMA
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The refund policy is designed to facilitate an understanding of the refund policies set forth
in the Amendments to Education Law Section 5002 passed in July, 1990 and in compliance
with the Minimum Standard and Criteria set by Georgia NPEC in 2015.
WiTHdrAWinG frOm ALL CLAsses
If a student withdraws from all classes after the first day of the semester, he/she is entitled to
a partial tuition refund depending on the percentage of the semester that has passed since
the first day of the semester.
1.3.4. refUnds
1.3.3. TUiTiOn And fees
DEGREE PROGRAM
TUITION PER CREDIT HOUR
BA PROGRAM $180.00
MASTER PROGRAM
$250.00
ITEM
FEE
APPLICATION FEE
$100.00
GRADUATION FEE
$300.00
FACILITY FEE $100 /per each semester
LATE REGISTRATION FEE
$200.00
RETURNED CHECK CHARGE $35.00
OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPT
$10.00
DOCUMENT FEE
$5.00 /per document
STUDENT ID REPRODUCTION FEE $10.00
FINANCIAL INFORMA
TION
A student who cancels before the beginning of the semester or at the first day of the
semester receives all monies paid with the exception of the non-refundable
registration fee.
Thereafter, a student will be liable for (1) the non-refundable registration fee, (2) the
cost of any textbooks or supplies accepted, and (3) tuition liability as of the student’s
last date of attendance at the university. Total tuition liability is limited to the semes-
ter during which the student withdrew or was terminated in addition to any complet-
ed prior terms.
THinGs TO Be COnsidered fOr A refUnd

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TUiTiOn refUnd sCHedULe
The amount of the Tuition Refund is determined by a pro-rata basis up to 50 % completion
of the semester days to the student’s withdrawal date or the last date of attendance by the
student, whichever is later.
If the student withdraws after completing 50% of the semester, no Tuition Refund shall be
given.
This Tuition Refund policy applies to full withdrawals only; no partial withdrawals will be
applicable to Tuition Refunds.
Hudson Taylor University shall pay the Refund within thirty days of the date of withdrawal.
To be eligible for a refund, written notification of withdrawal must be submitted to the
Office of Business Affairs.
In addition to the stated policy herein, Hudson Taylor University will review the
student’s extenuating circumstances such as injury, prolonged illness, death, or other
circumstances which prohibit completion of the semester or program of study, and
at its sole discretion, grant a tuition refund beyond the amount prescribed in this
section.
There are no refunds for late charges, administrative charges, scholarships, or late
fees.
FINANCIAL INFORMA
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1.3.5. sCHOLArsHiPs
Hudson Taylor University encourages and grants scholarships to students based upon their
academic records, attendance records, service to the community, and commitment to the
welfare of fellow students and Hudson Taylor community.
Recipients of scholarships are selected either by a student’s application, or recommendation
by the faculty or administration. The Scholarship Committee is comprised of the President,
Director of Academic Affairs, Director of Admissions and Director of Student Affairs. The
decision to grant a scholarship is made by consensus or unanimous approval of all members
of the Committee.
violation of the Attendance policy and/ or Academic standing such as Warning or Probation
will result in the cancellation of a scholarship.
Currently, there are two Scholarships that are granted to students.
ACAdemiC ACHievemenT sCHOLArsHiP
The recipient must be a full time student with at least two semesters of academic record at
Hudson Taylor. The student’s overall GPA must be at least 3.75. In addition, a recommen-
dation letter from a member of the faculty is required. There is no formulaic method for
selection, but all four factors must be considered outstanding before the grant is made: (1)
academic record, (2) attendance record, (3) service to the community, (4) and personal attri-
butes or leadership characteristics. The selection and grant of the Scholarship is made each
semester and the recipients are awarded $500.00 toward their tuition payment.
PresidenT’s sCHOLArsHiP
The recipient of the President’s Scholarship must exhibit extraordinary commitment to
leadership in his or her respective community, and must demonstrate selfless dedication to
the needs of their community, society, their country and the world. The application for this
Scholarship must be accompanied by a personal essay and recommendation letter. There
is no formulaic method for selection, but all four factors must be considered outstanding
before the grant is made: (1) academic record, (2) attendance record, (3) service to the com-
munity, (4) and personal attributes or leadership characteristics. The selection and grant of
the Scholarship is made by the Committee with the final determination of the amount of the
grant by the President. It can range from $500.00 per semester to full coverage of all costs
while attending Hudson Taylor.
FINANCIAL INFORMA
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1.4 STUDENT LIFE
All students are eligible for membership in the Student Government Association (SGA) of
Hudson Taylor University. SGA is responsible for matters of general student concern. The
President , vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer of SGA are elected through a general
campus election. Under the supervision of the Office of Student Affairs, SGA coordinates
the interactions between campus organizations, the student body, the faculty, and the
administration.
As required by federal regulations (Drug-Free School and Community Act Amendments
of 1989), Hudson Taylor University maintains the following policies regarding a drug-free
campus:
The unlawful possession, use, or distribution of a controlled substance is prohibited
on Hudson Taylor University property or as part of any University activity.
Employees or students found to be in violation of a drug-free environment will be
subject to appropriate action, including but not limited to termination or dismissal.
Any employee or student who becomes aware of a violation of this policy should
report it immediately to the Director of Student Affairs, the Director of Academic
Affairs, or the Administration Office so that the matter can be investigated.
Alcohol and drug consumption causes changes in behavior, ranging from impaired judg-
ment and coordination, to inhibiting a person’s ability to learn and use higher mental
functions. Repeated use can lead to dependence, and long-term use will cause permanent
damage to the brain, liver, and other vital organs.
1.4.1. sTUdenT GOvernmenT AssOCiATiOn (sGA)
1.4.2. drUG-free CAmPUs
STUDENT LIFE

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1.4.3. sexUAL HArAssmenT POLiCy
Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that violates Title vII of the Civil Rights Act
of 1964. Each student, staff, and faculty member should be able to work in an atmosphere
free from discriminatory intimidation based on sex, as well as intimidation based on race,
color, age, national origin, or disability. Sexual harassment of students, staff, or faculty by
any member of the University community will not be tolerated.
Sexual harassment includes any repeated or unwanted verbal or sexual advances, sexually
explicit derogatory remarks, or offensive statements made by someone in the workplace
when
(1)
Submission to the conduct is either explicitly or implicitly a condition of
employment, grades, or good will;
(2)
Submission to or rejection of the conduct is used as a basis for grading or relational
decisions affecting any person; or
(3)
The conduct has the purpose of effect of substantially interfering with student, staff,
or faculty performance of duties, or of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive
work or learning environment.
Any student experiencing or observing sexual harassment as described in any of the above
categories should report the incident immediately to the Director of Student Affairs.
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1.4.4. WeAPOns
Students are prohibited from using or possessing dangerous weapons, or facsimiles of
dangerous weapons, on Hudson Taylor University property. These items include but are not
limited to firearms, explosives, fireworks, incendiary devices, pellet guns, knives or other
sharp blades.
STUDENT LIFE

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1.5. CHAPEL POLICIES
1.5.1. CHAPeL serviCes
1.5.2. CHAPeL ATTendAnCe reQUiremenTs
1.5.3. POLiCy viOLATiOns
1.5.4. COmmenCemenT CHAPeL And CeremOny
The administration and faculty strongly believe in the contribution and vital role of chapel
and its ministry of encouragement, worship, and community development. Prayer needs,
campus announcements, and items of general interest are shared during this community
time of rest, relief, and renewal.
During the fall and spring semesters chapel is held regularly. Days and times may differ each
semester.
All Hudson Taylor University students (full-time or part-time) are required to attend weekly
chapel services during the semester.
Failure to attend and report attendance is considered to be a violation of the chapel
attendance policy. Repeated violations will result in a warning letter from the Director of
Student Affairs that will be placed in the student’s file.
The faculty believes the commencement events are a vital part of the academic calendar.
All non-graduating students are encouraged to attend the commencement chapel and the
ceremony to show support for the graduates.
CHAPEL POLICIES

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1.6. CHRISTIAN SERVICE PROGRAM
i. inTrOdUCTiOn
It is natural that students should be involved in various ministry formation programs for the
purpose of spiritual development. Chapel offers the opportunity to increase faithfulness,
biblical knowledge, and theological knowledge. Practical experiences with local churches
and the community allow the students to put their knowledge into practice.
Therefore, the Christian Service Program (CSP) of Hudson Taylor University should be an in-
tegral part of the total Christian service experience. While academic courses are important,
CSP is just as important so that spiritual aspects and commitments may be developed and
solidified outside the classroom. This is so that we can fulfill the nature of ministry that St.
Paul discusses in Ephesians 4:12.
1. THe GOALs
Hudson Taylor University exists to provide men and women with a Biblically-based educa-
tion designed to prepare them for success in their religious or secular careers by enhancing
their spiritual, social, and intellectual gifts and abilities.
For this mission, Hudson Taylor University encourages students to regularly practice
Christian service so that they may use their gifts for the glory of God.
A. The First Goal: To train students to take action in faith through obedience to the word
of God.
The CSP of Hudson Taylor University provides opportunities for students to balance their
scriptural study with practice by allowing them to participate in practical experiences in
Christian ministry. The goal is to encourage students in fulfilling the word of God by active
participation in ministry areas in local churches or the community. Consequently, it serves to
aid students in integrating their faiths and learning by requiring them to exercise spiritual
disciplines and further develop personal ministry skills.
B. The Second Goal: Demonstration of Bible Truths in Ministry
According to Philippians 4:9 “Whatever you have learned or received or heard from me,
or seen in me--put it into practice,” students should have the ability to demonstrate how
to use the principles of Bible truths and the meaning of the Scripture in local churches and
communities.
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C. The Third Goal: Teaching Ministry
According to 1 Timothy 4:11 “Command and teach these things,” students must fulfill the
gospel mission through the teaching ministry in local churches and communities.
D. The Fourth Goal: Development of Personal Talents in Service
The Bible teaches Christians to use their God-given gifts to serve Him, His Church, and
the community. The CSP is actually planned so that students can influence the world, and
demonstrate a keenly developed sense of commitment to glorify God in all aspects of their
daily lives.
ii. PrACTiCAL minisTry PArTiCiPATiOn
The Christian Service Program is committed to a process that implements a practical,
hands- on experience for all of our students. Christian Service is a required academic
component with evaluation and accountability through local ministries or community
programs.
Although the mission of Hudson Taylor University never changes, we must constantly
evaluate our Christian Service Program to insure that we are providing a missional
experience for all of our students. Hudson Taylor University values the practical application
of classroom learning in order to effectively prepare students to enter full time ministry or
lay leadership.
Hudson Taylor Ministries hosts 30 minute Chapel services for their Faculty, Staff, and
Students. Family members and visitors are also welcome. Service times are Monday at
11:35 a.m., Tuesday at 2:15 p.m., and Saturday at 8:25 a.m.
Hudson Taylor University seeks to prepare all students for Christian life and ministries in
local churches or communities by encouraging them to participate in practical Christian
services and develop their personal character, commitment, and social skills in the context
of a global atmosphere.
The Christian Service Program (CSP) at Hudson Taylor University is mandatory for all
students. They will not receive their diploma until the CSP requirements are fulfilled.
CHRISTIAN SER
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1. APPrOved serviCe AreAs
A. Chapel
Praise and Worship Singer
Worship Leader
Instrumentalist
Support Person for Praise and Worship Team
B. Church
Sunday School
Youth Ministry
Choir
Music Ministry
Mission
Cell Group Prayer Meeting
Church’s Administrative Work
C. Campus
Helping with campus maintenance. (i.e. cleaning the office, library, cafeteria)
Assisting with official Hudson Taylor University events (i.e. helping with summer
seminar, commencement ceremony, summer music festival, winter seminar)
Assisting a faculty member with a specific mission (i.e. helping with the
administrative work of the mission)
D. Community
Food Service for the Homeless
Nursing Home Service
Medical Assistance Service or Hospital Volunteer
Child Care
CHRISTIAN SER
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2. evALUATiOn
The student will receive a grade after the completion of the approved service. The super-
visor at the site will provide the final evaluation. The student will earn 1 point per hour of
participation in each approved service area.
The total required points for the Christian Service Program are as follows:
Bachelor of Arts in Biblical Studies students: 120 points
Master of Arts in Theological Studies students: 48 points
Master of Divinity students: 90 points
Transfer students should earn 1 service hour for each credit hour remaining in their
programs.
Students can earn a maximum of 20 CSP points per semester.
CHRISTIAN SER
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1.7. HEALTH CARE POLICY
Hudson Taylor University adheres to the health and safety guidelines set forth by the
Georgia Department of Public Health, and by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as they
relate to communicable diseases. Communicable diseases prevalent in the United States
and Canada include Influenza, Infectious Mononucleosis, Hepatitis A and B, Measles,
Meningitis, Mumps, Chicken Pox, Tuberculosis, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome
(AIDS, including ARC, HIv, HTLv-IIILAv), and sexually transmitted diseases such as
Chlamydia, Herpes, Syphilis, and Gonorrhea.
Since communicable diseases pose both primary risks to the infected person, and second-
ary risks to those who come in contact with an infected person, each case shall be handled
with concern for the individual as well as for the University community. Any staff member,
faculty member, or student who becomes aware that he or she has a communicable disease,
either through diagnosis or because of obvious symptoms, should report this immediately
to the vice President and the Director of Student Affairs. All information shall be considered
confidential. The individual’s right to privacy shall be protected in all reported incidents.
Hudson Taylor University will only report cases of communicable diseases to local health
agencies when it is required by law.
In the case of a casually transmitted disease, the vice President and the Director of Student
Affairs have the right to impose, based on all relevant information available, any restriction
of campus activities on the infected individual. For communicable diseases not casually
transmitted, the vice President and the Director of Student Affairs shall make any
determinations with regard to restricting the individual’s campus activities.
Some communicable diseases are not spread by casual contact. Due to the method of
a cquisition of such diseases, the standards of the University may require disciplinary action
for some individuals. Regardless of whether or not a disease is transmitted, persons
engaging in such acts will be reviewed equally.
ADMISSIONS INFORMA
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1.8. STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
Blessed is the man who does not walk in the counsel
of the wicked or stand in the way of sinners or sit in the
seat of mockers.
But his delight is in the law of the LORD, and on his
law he meditates day and night.
-Psalms 1:1-2
1.8.1. POLiCy On reAsOnABLe ACCOmmOdATiOns
In accordance with Section 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990, Hudson Taylor University will make reasonable accommodations
to ensure equal opportunities and access for qualified students to applicable programs, ser-
vices, activities, and facilities.
After acceptance as a Hudson Taylor student, anyone with a disability must submit written
requests for modifications or auxiliary aids to the Office of Administration. Documentation of
the disability may be required in order to receive appropriate modifications.
Hudson Taylor University will not make substantial adjustments in existing programs beyond
those necessary to eliminate discrimination against otherwise qualified students, and will not
modify existing programs to the extent that it places an undue financial or administrative
burden on the University. Hudson Taylor University assumes no responsibility for personal
care attendants, health-care providers, personal devices, individually prescribed devices, and
readers for personal use or study, or private tutors.
ADMISSIONS INFORMA
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1.9. ACADEMIC INTEGRITY AND MISCONDUCT
Hudson Taylor University considers the following types of academic misconduct, to be seri-
ous enough for review of a student’s status at the university.
Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to the actions listed below. All Students
are advised to refer to the Attendance Policy, Withdrawal Policy, and University Standards in
the catalog.
Plagiarism: A student plagiarizes if he or she gives the impression that the ideas, words
or work of another person are the ideas, words or work of the student. Plagiarism is to be
distinguished from inadequate and/or inappropriate attempts to acknowledge the words,
works or ideas of someone else. Plagiarism includes, but is not limited to:
Copying unacknowledged passages from textbooks;
Reusing in whole or in part the work of another student;
Obtaining materials from the Web and submitting them, modified or otherwise, as
one’s own work;
Submitting work which is derived in whole or in part from the work of another
person but has been changed in superficial respects, possibly by mechanical means.
Cheating: A student is considered to have cheated if he or she does not abide by the
conditions set by a particular learning experience, item of assessment or examination.
Cheating includes, but is not limited to:
Falsifying data obtained from surveys or similar activities;
Copying the answers of another student in an examination or allowing other
students to copy answers in an examination;
Taking unauthorized materials into an examination;
Sitting an examination for another student or having another person at an
examination on behalf of a student;
Removing an examination question paper from an examination room where this is
contrary to instructions;
Improperly obtaining and using information about an examination before the
examination;
Making changes to an assignment that has been marked, then returning it for
re-marking claiming that it was not correctly marked.
1.
2.
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Collusion: A student commits collusion when he or she works with another person or
persons without the permission of the instructor to produce work which is then presented as
work completed independently by the student. Collusion includes, but is not limited to:
Writing the whole or part of an assignment with another person;
Using the notes of another person to prepare an assignment;
Using another person’s resource materials that have been previously annotated,
highlighted or underlined.
Allowing another student, who has to submit an assignment on the same topic,
access to one’s own assignment under conditions which would give that other
student an advantage in submitting his or her assignment.
Other: A student commits an act of academic misconduct when he or she inhibits or
prevents other people’s legitimate learning or teaching. Such actions include but are not
limited to:
Any infringement of the library rules, including specifically
(i) withholding books from the library in such a way that prevents other students
from having access to the books at the time they may need them
(ii) defacing books from the library, or
(iii) stealing books from the library;
Any disruption of classes;
Any other conduct which unreasonably impairs the rights of other persons to pursue
their work, studies or research.
For further regulations and policies, please refer to the Student Handbook.
3.
4.
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY AND MISCONDUCT
Be joyful always;
pray continually;
give thanks in all circumstances, for this is
God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.
1 Thessalonians 5:16-18

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1.10. GRIEVANCE POLICY
In the case of any complaints made by students, it is our desire that they should be resolved
before a serious problem develops. However, if the issue persists to the extent of being
detrimental to the student and to the university, the student should follow the procedure de-
scribed below by bringing the complaint in written form to the Director of Student Affairs (for
non-academic concerns) or the Director of Academic Affairs (for academic concerns).
a.
Discussion of the problem with the Director of Student Affairs is encouraged as the
first step for non-academic concerns.
b.
Discussion of the problem with the Director of Academic affairs is recommended for
academic related concerns. If the student does not believe a discussion with either
director is appropriate, he/she should proceed directly with the steps described
below.
c.
If discussion does not resolve the matter to the student’s satisfaction, the student may
proceed to the formal grievance stage by presenting a written grievance to the
President.
d.
If the student is not satisfied with the University’s decision, he/she may then appeal to
the Nonpublic Postsecondary Education Commission.
Nonpublic Postsecondary Education Commission
2082 East Exchange Place, Suite 220
Tucker, Georgia 30084-5305
(770) 414-3300, Fax (770) 414-3309
http://www.gnpec.org
GRIEV
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1.11. ACADEMIC INFORMATION
Hudson Taylor University attempts to make the registration process as efficient as possible for
students. Student should register during the registration period assigned to them.
Registration priority is given to students graduating within the upcoming academic year.
A late registration fee is charged to students who register after the registration deadline.
Those who register late run the risk of not getting into necessary courses if they are at capac-
ity, or canceled due to lack of enrollment. Official registration must be completed before the
student attends classes. The student’s registration will become valid upon the payment of
the tuition and fees.
During the first week of each semester, students may make schedule changes – dropping and
adding courses. Courses cannot be added after the first week of classes without the approval
of the Academic Office.
If the students do not pay tuition by the appropriate payment deadline, their registration will
be voided. They will also lose registration priority.
Students who enroll in courses that are not required by the degree program to which they
are admitted may be denied registration to those courses except if the course is a non-major
elective.
1.11.1. reGisTrATiOn
ACADEMIC INFORMA
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1.11.3. ACAdemiC AssessmenT sysTem
GrAde symBOLs
A - work of excellent quality
B - work of commendable quality
C - work of acceptable quality
D - work of minimal but passing quality
F - failure to do minimal passing work; with no credit given
In order to receive credit, the student must repeat a required course, but may either repeat or
take another elective course if applicable.
AU - Audit
I – Incomplete
NC – No Credit
TR – Transfer
WD – Withdrew
P – Pass
ACADEMIC INFORMA
TION
1.11.2. GrAdinG sCALe
Grade points are determined on the basis of hours attempted according to the following
scale;
A
(94-100)
4.0
A-
(90-93)
3.7
B+
(87-89)
3.3
B
(84-86)
3.0
B-
(80-83)
2.7
C+
(77-79)
2.3
C
(74-76)
2.0
C-
(70-73)
1.7
D+
(67-69)
1.3
D
(64-66)
1.0
D-
(60-63)
0.7
F
Less than 60 0

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1.11.4. ATTendAnCe POLiCy
1.11.5. WiTHdrAWAL Or LeAve Of ABsenCe
nOTifiCATiOn Of WiTHdrAWAL
Students who choose to withdraw from Underwood University must submit proper notifica-
tion to the Registrar’s Office. Withdrawing students who qualify and who appropriately notify
the Registrar’s Office will receive a tuition refund in accordance with Hudson Taylor Universi-
ty’s refund policy.
LeAve Of ABsenCe
A leave of absence is a special category of withdrawal that may be requested by a student
who intends to withdraw for a period not to exceed one year from the end of their last term
of enrollment. Students who need a leave of absence must meet with their academic advisers
and submit an application form with supporting documents to be allowed by the office of
Academic Affairs.
ACADEMIC INFORMA
TION
Academic credit for a course requires regular class attendance. Class attendance means
being present in the classroom for the entire class meeting. The student’s physical presence
is crucial in any class meeting regardless of whether or not the student’s assignments are
completed. The maximum absence allowance is three (3) class sessions in a semester. Once
a student reaches the limit of missed classes, the instructor is required to report the student’s
absence status to the Office of Academic Affairs for further evaluation.
All faculty members are required to maintain an accurate attendance record and begin class
on time. When it becomes necessary for a student to miss a class for any reason, the student
is encouraged to submit a class absence excusal form and to contact the instructor via email
to make arrangements to complete missed assignments. For an excused absence, the stu-
dent must provide documented proof (i.e. court doc, doctor’s note, death certificate, birth
certificate, flight itinerary, etc.). Excusable reasons for absence are Medical appointments,
Surgery, Religious activities, Family activities – (wedding, engagement party), Military service,
Jury duty, Court hearing, Funeral, Accident, etc. In the event of an absence for any reason, the
student is responsible for any information or class content missed. In some cases, additional
work is required to make up for an absence. If not made up, this may result in a lower grade
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reAdmissiOn fOLLOWinG WiTHdrAWAL
Readmission after a period of absence exceeding one year requires reapplication through the
Admissions Office. Readmission following a withdrawal or leave of absence is subject to the
approval of the registrar and/or the director of Admissions, and in some cases the Director
of Student Affairs. Students readmitted following a withdrawal are subject to the program
requirements of the catalog under which they reenter.
1.11.6. ACAdemiC WArninG, PrOBATiOn, And dismissAL
Or TerminATiOn
ACADEMIC WARnInG
Student’s most recent academic performance has been unsatisfactory or the overall average
is below the minimum requirement (GPA 2.00)
Academic warning is a subcategory of academic standing, differing only in the maximum
allowable schedule load.
ACADEMIC PROBATIOn
Two consecutive semesters with a GPA below 2.00.
Student’s most recent academic performance has been extremely unsatisfactory or the term
average has continued to be unsatisfactory or the overall academic average has continued to
be below the minimum requirement.
ACADEMIC DISMISSAL OR TERMInATIOn
After probation, the student still fails to meet the above standards for academic good stand-
ing, then he or she will be subject to academic dismissal or termination.
Student’s most recent academic performance has been extremely unsatisfactory or the term
average has continued to be unsatisfactory or the overall academic average has continued to
be below the minimum requirement.
The situations below are considered for withdrawal or dismissal.
Lengthy Illness requiring extensive hospitalization (Medical Doctor’s note required)
Violations of school regulations that demand discipline and misconduct
Disqualification by failure to meet all the requirements of classes and graduation
Failure to register during the prescribed period.
ACADEMIC INFORMA
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1.11.7. PermAnenT ACAdemiC reCOrd
All recorded grades become a permanent part of the student’s academic history. If a student
receives a failing grade, that grade will remain on the record. If such a course is re-taken, the
new registration and grade will also be recorded on the student’s permanent record. After
two years, it is understood that both the professor and student have enough time to adjust
any grade concerns; thus, the adjusted grade becomes permanent and cannot be changed.
1.11.8. GenerAL GrAdUATiOn POLiCy
GRADuATIOn APPLICATIOn
All students expecting to complete their academic program in a given semester must apply
for graduation in the semester prior to their expected graduation by submitting a form and a
clearance request for graduation, to the office of Academic Affairs.
GRADuATIOn PROCEDuRES
All graduation requirements must be met by the end of the semester for graduation. A stu-
dent may not graduate or participate in commencement while under any probationary or
disciplinary action.
A minimum grade point average of 2.0 is required for graduation in all degree programs. A
minimum grade point average of 3.95 qualifies for highest honors, 3.85 for high honors, and
3.60 for honors.
Degrees are conferred in May, August, and January. The graduation ceremony is held each
May. Students who satisfactorily complete their course work in the summer session will re-
ceive degree conferral in August. Students who complete their degree requirements in De-
cember will receive degree conferral in January and may participate in the commencement
ceremony the following May.
ACADEMIC INFORMA
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UnderGrAdUATe PrOGrAms
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BIBLICAL STUDIES (BABS)

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BACHeLOr Of ArTs in BiBLiCAL sTUdies
(BABs)
A. PUrPOse
B. OBjeCTives
C. PrOGrAm reQUiremenTs
The Bachelor programs in Biblical Studies at Hudson Taylor University are designed to pre-
pare students to grasp the message of the Bible, accurately interpret the Scriptures, and
integrate faith into the world. The Biblical Studies major prepares students for positions of
lay leadership in church, society, or a variety of Christian ministries at home or abroad. The
degree meets needs of individuals who wish to begin or to continue graduate theological
education for personal or vocational enrichment.
The Bachelor of Arts in Biblical Studies degree program requires 120 semester hours for grad-
uation. The curriculum includes 45 credit hours in general education coursework, 75 credit
hours in the major and non-major course work, including two University Core courses, and
eight non-credit “IR”s (Institutional Requirement). A full-time student following the course
sequencing provided will be able to complete the program in eight semesters, or four years.
Graduates of the BABS will be prepared to:
1.
Demonstrate basic understanding of Biblical Literature, History, and Theology of
Israel and of early Christianity.
2.
Introduce critical methods involved in biblical study for an interpretation of the Bible.
3.
Develop skills in the use of the Bible for theology of ministry.
4.
Enable their skills to associate with the Biblical texts, Hebrew and Greek, in order to
exercise the exegesis of the original texts of the Bible.
5.
Apply their deeper understandings of the theological issues to a lifelong pattern of
spiritual growth and personal development.
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1. General education (45 Credit Hours)
Hudson Taylor University has established a general education program that engages
students in many different fields of learning. Its purpose is to introduce the students to
the breadth of liberal arts learning and to provide the foundations (biblical, conceptual,
and contextual) for all subsequent education and for learning across their lifespans. Each
undergraduate student is required to complete 45 credit hours in these courses.
1) Language requirement: six credit hours
Writing and Communication (Select Two, 6 credits)
Credit Hours
ENG101 English Grammar
3
ENG102 English Composition
3
ENG103 Theological English I
3
ENG104 Theological English II
3
2) Bible Language requirement: six credit hours
Biblical Language: Required
Credit Hours
FLG151 Elementary Biblical Greek I
3
FLH141 Elementary Biblical Hebrew I
3
3) General education electives: Thirty-three credit hours
Select eleven courses from the below and any combination of selection is allowed.
Communication
Credit Hours
COMM101 Introduction to Communication
3
COMM102 Public Presentation
3
Foreign Language
Credit Hours
FLS101 Spanish I
3
FLS102 Spanish II
3
FLC101 Chinese I
3
FLC102 Chinese II
3
FLG152 Elementary Biblical Greek II
3
FLH142 Elementary Biblical Hebrew II
3
FLJ101 Japanese I
3
FLJ102 Japanese II
3
LK101 Korean I
3
FLK102 Korean II
3
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Fine Arts/Music/Physical Education/Dance
Credit Hours
ART101 Fundamentals of Arts and Design
3
ART108 Three-Dimensional Design
3
ART110 Basic Drawing
3
ART130 Western Art History & Impression
3
ART131 Theories of Design & Color
3
ART160 Two-Dimensional Design
3
MUS100 Music Appreciation
3
MUS105 Fundamentals of Music
3
MUS106 University Chorus
3
MUS120 Introduction to Music
3
PED101 Physical Education I
3
PED102 Physical Education II
3
DNC100 Introduction to Dance
3
Mathematics/Statistics
Credit Hours
MAT101 College Algebra
3
MAT102 Probability
3
MAT103 Statistics
3
MAT151 Calculus I
3
Science
Credit Hours
CHEM110 Contemporary Chemistry
3
BIO101 Topics in Biology
3
PHy103 Survey of Physics
3
PHy191 Physics in Modern Technology
3
CSI110 Basic Computer and Microsoft Applications
3
Religion/Humanities/Social Sciences/History/Education
Credit Hours
HIS130 History of America
3
HIS131 History of America II
3
HIS150 History of Modern Business
3
HPR105 History of Black Church
3
HPR120 World Civilization
3
HPR150 Civilization and Religions
3
HPR201 Church and Race
3
ICS104 Survey of the World Religions
3
ICS205 Intercultural Communication
3
CSI130 Introduction to Social Media
3
BS120 Dynamics in Leadership
3
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PHIL101 Introduction to Philosophy
3
PHIL200 Ethics
3
PSy101 Introduction to Psychology
3
RCE101 Introduction to Today’s Education
3
RCE120 Theories of Faith Development
3
RCE125 Psychology in Education: Cognitive Development
3
RCE150 Parent-Child Relationships
3
RCE201 Survey of Christian Education
3
RPS105 Marriage and Family
3
RPS110 Science and Religion
3
RPS112 Psychology of Religious Experience
3
RPS115 Personality and Morality
3
RPS120 Stress Management
3
RS105 Sociology of Religion
3
RS115 Race and Ethnic Relations
3
SOC101 Introduction to Sociology
3
SPT120 Society and Moral value
3
SPT201 Comparative Religions
3
SPT210 Gandhi/Marx/Niebuhr
3
Religion-Law/Business Management/Leadership
Credit Hours
POL101 Introduction to Political Science
3
RLA105 Justice Among Nations
3
RLA110 American Public Policy and Religious Freedom
3
RLA120 Civil Rights and Black Consciousness Movement
3
ECON101 Principles of Economics I (Fundamentals and Micro)
3
LDS101 Developing the Healthy Leader
3
LDS102 Leadership and Interpersonal Relationship
3
LDS105 Life and Time Management of a Leader
3
2. Biblical studies Core: required 39 Credit Hours (13 courses)
Biblical Language courses must be taken in conjunction with six credit hours (2 courses) with
FLG151 and FLH141 in General Education.
Required Core Courses (13 courses, 39 credits)
Credit Hours
BS200 History of Israel
3
BS210 Background of the New Testament World
3
BS400 Biblical Hermeneutics
3
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OT200 Old Testament Survey
3
OT202 Pentateuch
3
OT204 the Major Prophets
3
OT401 Old Testament Exegesis
3
OT420 Old Testament Theology
3
NT200 New Testament Survey
3
NT202 Synoptic Gospels
3
NT204 Pauline Literature
3
NT401 New Testament Exegesis
3
NT420 New Testament Theology
3
3. Biblical studies electives: required 12 Credit Hours (4 courses)
Select four courses from Biblical Studies courses except core courses indicated by an aster-
isk mark.
Foundations of the Bible
Credit Hours
BS200 History of Israel*
3
BS210 Background of the New Testament World*
3
BS220 Inter-Testamental Period History
3
BS230 Rise and Development of Early Christianity
3
BS300 Issues in Biblical Interpretation
3
BS350 Bible Land Geography and Biblical Archaeology
3
BS400 Biblical Hermeneutics*
3
BS410 Apocalyptic Literature
3
BS450 Holy Land Project (Bible Lands Study Tour)
3
Old Testament
Credit Hours
OT200 Old Testament Survey*
3
OT202 Pentateuch*
3
OT203 Historical Books
3
OT204 Major Prophets*
3
OT205 Minor Prophets
3
OT206 Wisdom Literature
3
OT301 Genesis
3
OT305 Nehemiah
3
OT306 Psalms as Literature & Spirituality
3
OT400 Jeremiah
3
OT401 Old Testament Exegesis*
3
OT420 Old Testament Theology*
3
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new Testament
Credit Hours
NT200 New Testament Survey*
3
NT202 Synoptic Gospels*
3
NT203 Gospel of John and Johannine Epistles
3
NT204 Pauline Literature*
3
NT205 General Epistles
3
NT300 Romans
3
NT304 Acts of the Apostles
3
NT305 1 Corinthians
3
NT306 Letter of James
3
NT310 Parables of Jesus
3
NT320 Gospel of Mark as a Story
3
NT350 Miracle Stories
3
NT360 Pauline Theology
3
NT400 Book of Revelation
3
NT401 New Testament Exegesis*
3
NT405 Soteriology of St. Paul
3
NT410 Use of Old Testament in the New Testament
3
NT412 Christology in the New Testament
3
NT420 New Testament Theology*
3
4. non-major electives: required 18 Credit Hours (6 courses)
Select six courses from the following credit hours below or six courses from other depart-
ments, level 200 or higher.
Theology/Mission/Education/Leadership (Select Six, 18 credits)
Credit Hours
ICS205 Intercultural Communications
3
MIS210 Mission Perspectives
3
PT230 Public Speech as Preaching
3
PT250 Discipleship and Evangelism
3
PCC300 Pastoral Care and Listening
3
PT350 Foundations of Children’s Ministry
3
PT410 Christian Worship and Liturgy
3
MUS210 Introduction and Listening to Church Music
3
SPT200 Christian Perspective and Philosophical Thought
3
SPT300 Introduction to Systematic Theology
3
HPR310 History of Christianity
3
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RS230 Jesus, Then and Now
3
RS250 the Church and Social Concern
3
RCE210 Foundations of Christian Education
3
LDS300 Biblical Perspective on Leadership
3
LDS310 Leadership in Cross-Cultural Context
3
PEM200 Introduction to Sports Mission
3
5. University Core (6 credits)
Credit Hours
PT200 Life Journey in Faith
3
PT202 Life Journey Practicum
3
PT203 Career Development
3
6. institutional requirement (“ir”): required 8
Students are required to complete one non-credit “IR” each semester in chapel. Eight
semester “IR”s are required for graduation.
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Students are required to have a consultation with an advisor in planning their course of
study, selecting courses each semester to meet the program and curriculum requirements,
and meeting individual goals. The following suggested course sequencing is provided as
recommended courses over eight semesters to meet the program requirements and com-
plete the program within eight semesters of full time enrollment. An individual student’s
course plan may differ, if in consultation with the advisor, alternate courses are selected to
complete the program requirements. Those courses must be approved for the curriculum,
as documented in this Catalog.
First Semester
Credit Hours
ENG101 English Grammar or ENG103 Theological English I
3
FLG151 Elementary Biblical Greek I
3
Select Three General Education Electives
9
WS300 Institutional Requirement
Total 15
Second Semester
Credit Hours
ENG102 English Composition or ENG104 Theological English II
3
Select Four from General Education Electives
12
WS300 Institutional Requirement
Total 15
Third Semester
Credit Hours
Select Three General Education Electives
9
FLH141 Elementary Biblical Hebrew I
3
PT200 Life Journey in Faith
3
WS300 Institutional Requirement
Total 15
Fourth Semester
Credit Hours
Select One from General Education Electives
3
OT200 Old Testament Survey
3
NT200 New Testament Survey
3
Select Two from Non-Major Electives
6
WS300 Institutional Requirement
Total 15
d. sUGGesTed COUrse seQUenCinG
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Fifth Semester
Credit Hours
BS200 History of Israel
3
NT202 Synoptic Gospels
3
Select One from Non-Major Electives
3
BS210 Background of the New Testament World
3
Select One from Biblical Studies Electives
3
WS300 Institutional Requirement
Total 15
Sixth Semester
Credit Hours
Select One from Non-Major Electives
3
BS400 Biblical Hermeneutics
3
OT202 Pentateuch
3
OT204 Major Prophets
3
NT204 Pauline Literature
3
WS300 Institutional Requirement
Total 15
Seventh Semester
Credit Hours
Select Two from Non-Major Electives
6
OT401 Old Testament Exegesis
3
NT401 New Testament Exegesis
3
Select One from Biblical Studies Electives
3
WS300 Institutional Requirement
Total 15
Eighth Semester
Credit Hours
Select Two from Biblical Studies Electives
6
OT420 Old Testament Theology
3
NT420 New Testament Theology
3
PT202 Life Journey in Practicum or PT203 Career Development
3
WS300 Institutional Requirement
Total 15
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BIBLICAL STUDIES
BS120 Dynamics in Leadership (3 credits)
This study surveys some of the greatest Biblical char-
acters, examining the strengths, weaknesses, victo-
ries and defeats of each. Discover their leadership to
accomplish extraordinary things as ordinary people.
Through the depth of character within the people of
the Biblical stories, the student further explores the
topic of leadership from a biblical perspective. Es-
sential biblical principles bearing on the purpose and
character of leadership will be examined.
BS200 History of Israel (3 credits)
This study is a survey of the history of Israel from the
Patriarchal Period to the Babylonian Captivity (586
B.C.). Areas of study include the nomadic period &
the covenant of Sinai, the settlement in Canaan, the
tribal league & the emergence of the monarchy. The
study also includes the prophets & the religious con-
flict between yahweh & Baal and the fall of Samaria
(721) & the fall of Jerusalem (587).
BS210 Background of the new Testament World (3
credits)
The purpose of this course is to understand the his-
torical, cultural, and religious background of the Bible
at the time of the New Testament Writings. This study
focuses on the various circumferences emerging from
Christianity in the context of Judaism, the Hellenistic
religions, and the social history of the early Roman
Empire. It will help the students understand the life
context of the New Testament for the appropriate in-
terpretation.
BS220 Inter-Testamental Period History (3 credits)
This course overviews the politics, history, and society
during the inter-testamental period from the close of
the Old Testament canon in the fifth century BCE to
the formation of the New Testament writings in the
first century CE. In particular, it focuses on the lit-
eratures, religious thoughts, and theology that influ-
enced the development of Judaism and Christianity.
Prerequisite: OT200
BS230 Rise and Development of Early Christianity
(3 credits)
This study is an introductory course in the devel-
opment of Christianity in the first 8 centuries of the
Common Era and its interaction with its social, cultur-
al, & religious environment. This period is crucial to
the development of Christian faith, as basic parame-
ters of many of the key doctrines of the Church were
worked out here—parameters that have exerted a
normative influence on Christian life and thought.
BS300 Issues in Biblical Interpretation (3 credits)
Foundational for all biblical studies, this course will
introduce the students to the proper principles and
methods for correctly interpreting Scripture. It will
trace the history of interpreting the Bible since its
writing, the need for appropriate presuppositions,
the nature of pre-understanding, the goals for inter-
pretation, essential methods to perform the task, and
an introduction to the various genres of both testa-
ments as the requisite basis for doing biblical inter-
pretation today.
Prerequisites: OT200 or NT200
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BS350 Bible Land Geography and Biblical Archaeol-
ogy (3 credits)
A survey of the historical and physical geography
of the lands associated with the Bible. Emphasis is
placed on the background to scripture texts to en-
hance understanding of the Bible. It also acquaints
the students with archaeological findings and their
significance in understanding the Bible.
Prerequisites: OT200 or NT200
BS400 Biblical Hermeneutics (3 credits)
This course will survey criticisms of the New Testa-
ment primarily from the late eighteenth century to
the present. Particular emphasis on the development
of critical methodologies for the interpretation of the
Bible is given. This study will help the students to
explore the science of biblical interpretation by ex-
amining the various systems of the disciplines.
Prerequisites: OT200, NT200
BS410 Apocalyptic Literature (3 credits)
This course compares the books of Daniel and Reve-
lation and analyzes their prophecies of the end-times
that reveal the awesome sovereign power of God to
control all history.
Prerequisites: OT200, NT200
BS450 Holy Land Project (3 credits)
This project is to study the locations of Bible stories in
the Holy Land itself. This study includes cultural, his-
torical, geographical, and theological dimensions of
the Old Testament, New Testament, and the Church
through seminar lecture and travel to Holy Land. It
gives academic credit for a travel study tour with a
Biblical Studies Instructor. (The cost of the travel is
extra).
OT200 Old Testament Survey (3 credits)
This is an introductory study of the Pentateuch, his-
torical books, and the pre-exilic prophets. Special
attention will be given to reading the biblical text and
to various methods used to explicate its meaning.
The nature and use of scripture in ancient Israel and
in the contemporary church is another primary con-
cern. Exposure to biblical Hebrew as the all-import-
ant background for the worldview in the OT will also
occur.
OT202 Pentateuch (3 credits)
Within the context of modern scholarship, this course
seeks to survey the Pentateuch with attention to its
main theological and religious themes: exodus; cove-
nant; wandering in the desert; Deuteronomy; Moses
in the Pentateuch; Pentateuch and liberation; patri-
archs; primeval history; Pentateuch as story and can-
on.
OT203 Historical Books (3 credits)
A consideration of the basic outline of Israelite history
contained in the books of Joshua–2 Kings, Ezra, Ne-
hemiah, Esther, and 1 and 2 Chronicles. In addition to
content and theology, emphasis is on the historiogra-
phy of the biblical authors and differing modern his-
torical graphical approaches to these Old Testament
books.
Prerequisite: OT200.
OT204 Major Prophets (3 credits)
This course is a study of the historical setting and
message of the Old Testament prophets. The course
will survey all the major prophetic books briefly, and
focus in some detail on Isaiah and Jeremiah. Select-
ed passages will be exercised to interpret the mean-
ing of the text.
Prerequisite: OT200
OT205 Minor Prophets (3 credits)
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message of the Old Testament prophets. The course
will survey all the minor prophetic books briefly, and
focus in some detail on Hosea and Zechariah.
Prerequisite: OT200
OT206 Wisdom Literature (3 credits)
This course surveys the wisdom material of the OT,
seeing it as an attitude, a movement & a literature.
Wisdom theology is looked at within the context of
the OT as well as in our modern theological & pasto-
ral situation.
OT301 Genesis (3 credits)
This course is designed to help students become
acquainted with the book of Genesis, its theological
messages, and the implications for contemporary life.
Students are required to read the whole book and ex-
tensive analysis of some issues of the book. Prerequi-
sites: OT200 and BS300 or BS400
OT305 nehemiah (3 credits)
This course examines the history of Israel under Per-
sian rule as described in the book of Nehemiah. The
students consider the significance of return from ex-
ile, the rebuilding of the Temple, the preservation of
the covenant people, the social and religious reforms
of the post-exilic community, and biblical principles
of leadership.
Prerequisites: OT200 and BS300 or BS400
OT306 Psalms as Literature & Spirituality (3 credits)
This course will examine the typology and function of
the lament psalms, which comprise half of the Psal-
ter. Special attention will be given to the structure
of these psalms, their theological significance, spir-
itual-psychological dimension, social function, and
contemporary parallels.
OT400 Jeremiah (3 credits)
This course is an exegetical study of the book of Jer-
emiah. The place of Jeremiah within the prophetic
movement, his relationship to the Deuteronomic re-
form, “wisdom” in Jeremiah, and other concerns will
be dealt with in the course of the textual study.
Prerequisites: OT200 and BS300 or BS400
OT401 Old Testament Exegesis (3 credits)
This course is designed to acquaint the students with
a basic understanding of the principles of biblical
interpretation as well as the primary tools of biblical
research and exegetical methods. The students will
then apply these principles and tools to the exegesis
of selected Old Testament texts.
Prerequisites: OT200 and FLH141
OT420 Old Testament Theology (3 credits)
An examination of the message of the Old Testa-
ment, with special emphasis on Jesus in the Old Tes-
tament and topics such as law and grace, Israel and
the church, promise and fulfillment, and covenant
and faith.
Prerequisite: OT200
nT200 new Testament Survey (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to the documents of
the NT with special attention to their historical, social,
political and cultural settings. Students will examine
the historical movements and events to which the var-
ious documents responded and learn to use a variety
of critical tools.
nT202 Synoptic Gospels (3 credits)
This course is a study of the origin & literary relation-
ships of the gospels of Mark, Matthew, and Luke, with
special emphasis of the theology distinctive of each
gospel, including synoptic problems.
nT203 Gospel of John & Johannine Epistles (3 cred-
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This course exercises hermeneutical tools and inter-
pretative methodology for exegesis of the Fourth
Gospel & the letters of John.
Prerequisites: NT200 and BS300 or BS400
nT204 Pauline Literature (3 credits)
This is a study of the historical setting, structure, and
doctrinal emphases of Paul’s primary letters, includ-
ing Paul’s life & theology.
nT205 General Epistles (3 credits)
This course is a study of the historical background
and doctrinal emphases of the non-Pauline epistles.
Attention is given to matters of introduction and cur-
rent application.
nT300 Romans (3 credits)
This course will expose the students to reading of the
text of Paul’s letter to Roman Christians, with partic-
ular attention to the historic and contemporary func-
tion of the letter in the life of the church. This course
is a detailed exegesis of the entire book of Romans,
examining the most commented-on book in the New
Testament in the light of its historical, rhetorical, so-
ciological, theological, and ethical contexts. This
study stresses on the theology of Paul, with consider-
ation of the distinctive emphases of the epistle: Paul’s
teaching on Judaism, salvation history, the power of
sin, righteousness, the Holy Spirit, and the future of
Israel.
Prerequisites: NT200
nT304 Acts of the Apostles (3 credits)
This course is an exegetical study of the entire narra-
tive of Acts that explores Luke’s perspective on God’s
aim for the people of God and their mission. This
study will deal with the various textual, historical, rhe-
torical, exegetical, theological, and ethical concerns
raised by the only canonical book about early Chris-
tian history. Emphasis will be upon the structure and
the major themes found in the Book of Acts, with the
Gospel of Luke employed for background purposes.
Prerequisite: NT200
nT305 I Corinthians (3 credits)
This course is a study of the structure, setting & pur-
pose of 1 Corinthians, along with exegesis of select-
ed passages in respect to the problems Paul was ad-
dressing in the community.
nT306 Letter of James (3 credits)
This course explores a close reading of the letter
of James with special attention given to literary, so-
cio-historical, and theological understandings of the
epistle. This study also examines the relationships
between faith and action in the life of a Christian. In
this study, the students will investigate and commu-
nicate with the theological disciplinary issue: “what
is the relationship between biblical exegesis, on the
one hand, and the disciplines of theology and ethics
on the other?”
Prerequisites: NT200 and BS300 or BS400
nT310 Parables of Jesus (3 credits)
This course is an extensive study of selected portions
of the Parables of Jesus through exegetical and in-
terpretative methods to find its meaning and point of
views from the Bible. Prerequisites: NT200 or
BS300 or BS400
nT320 Mark Story (3 credits)
This course offers an exegetical study of the Gospel
of Mark, with careful attention given to social, rhetor-
ical, literary, and theological dimensions and implica-
tions of the text. This study will provide the students
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tion of the Jesus story and to engage literary and so-
ciological interpretations while reading the text. The
primary purpose of this course is to enable the stu-
dents to begin developing an understanding of the
whole gospel as a story of Jesus.
Prerequisite: NT200
nT350 Miracle Stories of Jesus (3 credits)
This course is an extensive study of selected portions
of the Miracle stories of Jesus through exegetical and
interpretative methods to find its meaning and point
of views from the Bible.
Prerequisites: NT200 or BS300 or BS400
nT360 Pauline Theology (3 credits)
This course is an overview of Paul’s theology through-
out his letters. This course explores the sense of
calling and mission that compelled Paul. The study
includes an exegetical study of selected portions of
Pauline letters with attention to selected theological
issues and their application to contemporary church
life.
Prerequisite: NT 200
nT400 Book of Revelation (3 credits)
This course is an overview of the Book of Revelation,
including its historical, cultural, social and political sit-
uations. This course includes consideration on the
issues of criticism, interpretation, and theology. Al-
though eschatology will be addressed as exegesis
requires, primary emphasis is on questions of content
and hermeneutics.
Prerequisites: NT200 and BS300 or BS400
nT401 new Testament Exegesis (3 credits)
This course guides the students on how to exegete
the New Testament text. This exegetical study will
cover various genres of New Testament writings. By
applying exegetical methods and interpretative tools,
the students exercise exegesis of the given passages
or texts in the New Testament.
Prerequisites: NT200 and FLG151
nT420 new Testament Theology (3 credits)
This course studies the general content and histor-
ical development of New Testament theology from
respective books and reflects on the perspective and
methodology of the contemporary biblical theology
discipline. The emphasis is on the distinctive contri-
butions of the biblical authors and the issue of uni-
ty and diversity within the canon of the New Testa-
ment.
Prerequisite: NT200
EDUCATION AND HISTORY &
PHENOMENOLOGY
OF RELIGIONS
RCE101 Introduction to Today’s Education (3 cred-
its)
This course is an introduction to the history, culture
and beliefs of modern education. Students will reflect
on current conditions and approaches to educational
system and its alternative strategies.
RCE120 Theories of Faith Development (3 credits)
This course focuses on the development of Faith
throughout a person’s life. Students will study vari-
ous theories from different perspectives in theology.
RCE125 Psychology in Education: Cognitive Devel-
opment (3 credits)
This study is a survey of life-span human cognitive
development covering prenatal, infant, child, adoles-

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cent, and adult periods. This study will introduce the
field of human cognition, surveying methods, con-
cepts, findings, and problems in perception, learning,
memory, thinking, problem solving, psycholinguistics,
and development.
RCE 130 Development of Interpersonal Relation-
ships (3 credits)
This course is an exploration of the prevailing theo-
ries and empirical research on the nature of signifi-
cant personal relationships and their interrelation-
ships with individual cognitive, social, emotional, and
behavioral development.
RCE 150 Parent- Child Relationships (3 credits)
This course provides an overview and critical analysis
of theory and research on the nature of parent-child
relationships. Parenting practices are explored
through discussion and case studies. Emphasis is
placed on the bidirectional processes by which par-
ents and children socialize each other.
RCE201 Survey of Christian Education (3 credits)
This is an introductory overview of the church’s in-
volvement in education, including the history, aims,
methods, and principle agencies of Christian Educa-
tion.
RCE210 Foundations of Christian Education (3 cred-
its)
This course introduces the historic foundations of
Christian education, including contemporary inno-
vations, methods, and applications of ministry using
the latest insights of social science and contemporary
thought. The course emphasizes that Christian edu-
cation is an all-encompassing endeavor and seeks to
help the students develop unique ways to minister to
others in the wider body of Christ.
HPR105 History of Black Church (3 credits)
This course studies the Black Church in the Afri-
can-American experience, concentrating on the
history of the churches comprising the seven major
historic black denominations: the African Method-
ist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church; the National Baptist
Convention, U.S.A. Incorporated (NBC); the Nation-
al Baptist Convention of America Unincorporated
(NBCA); the Progressive National Baptist Convention
(PNBC); and the Church of God in Christ (COGIC).
The purpose of this study is social description, which
provides historical overviews as well as statistical data
and analysis.
HPR120 World Civilization (3 credits)
This course is a study of Western and non-Western
cultures from antiquity through the Protestant Refor-
mation. Emphasis lays on the development of the
classical and medieval west and an introduction to
major world cultures and religions.
HPR150 Civilization and Religions (3 credits)
This course will survey the civilization history, beliefs,
texts, and practices of the world’s major religious tra-
ditions, including Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Bud-
dhism, Hinduism, Taoism and Confucianism. Special
attention will be paid to the experience of these reli-
gions in contemporary societies.
HPR201 Church and Race (3 credits)
This course will examine the church’s address to the
problem of Racisms. Looking at the church’s histori-
cal activity, it will view points at which the church has
been in complicity with forces fostering Racism &
places where the church has been a voice for racial
justice.
HPR300 History of korean Christianity (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the history of the

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Korean church, including how evangelistic work be-
gan and developed and how the Korean church has
grown. It explores the development of the church,
evangelistic strategy, persecution, growth, and mis-
sion. It also critically reflects, in the light of a missiol-
ogy, on various aspects of Korean mission.
HPR310 History of Christianity (3 credits)
This course is a survey of the history of the Christian
church from the New Testament to the present. Ap-
proximately equal time is spent on the early, medie-
val, Reformation, and modern periods.
HPR311 History of Christianity II (3 credits)
This course is a survey of the history of the Christian
church from the New Testament to the present. Ap-
proximately equal time is spent on the early, medie-
val, Reformation, and modern periods. Main focus of
this course is a study of Christianity from the immedi-
ate Post-Reformation era to the present day.
Prerequisite: HPR310
HPR320 History of Christian Thoughts (3 credits)
This course examines the development of Christian
thought and practice from the apostolic Fathers to
the modern period with an emphasis on the develop-
ment of doctrines and theology. Especially important
thinkers will be highlighted in the early church, Refor-
mation, and the 17th through 18th centuries.
FINE ARTS, MUSIC, DANCE AND
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
ART101 Fundamentals of Art and Design (3 credits)
This course investigates the elements and principles
of design that underlie all the visual arts. Students will
be introduced to the basic skills and techniques nec-
essary for the creation of well-crafted designs.
ART108 Three-Dimensional Design (3 credits)
The studio option with three-dimensional emphasis
offers the student the opportunity to study various 3D
studio media. Studio classes are offered in ceramics,
and sculpture. Instruction in the studio processes is
done with an emphasis on creativity, craftsmanship,
application and understanding of design principle,
and safety.
ART110 Basic Drawing (3 credits)
This course is designed to introduce the student to
the materials and techniques of drawing, focusing on
the representation and interpretation of objects and
natural forms. This course assumes no previous ex-
perience.
ART130 Western Art History & Impression (3 credits)
This course is designed to help students to under-
stand the ideology and the flow of the Western Art
History. Also, this course will discuss the impact on
the Modern Art History. The students will have op-
portunities to experience art pieces from different
eras.
ART131 Theories of Design & Color (3 credits)
With an introduction to design, this course focuses
on history and theories of modern design. Further-
more, the course discusses about the importance of
color in modern design as a primary factor. Through
this course, the students will be encouraged to apply
the learning in modern world.
ART160 Two-Dimensional Design (3 credits)
The studio option with two-dimensional emphasis

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offers students the opportunity to study various 2D
studio media. Studio classes are offered in drawing,
painting, and printmaking. Instruction in the studio
processes is done with an emphasis on creativity,
craftsmanship, application and understanding of de-
sign principle, and safety.
DnC100 Introduction to Dance (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to the theory and prac-
tice of dance as an expressive art form, a symbolic
language, and an integral aspect of world cultures.
The course is designed to help students grasp a
range of cultural, aesthetic, and bodily worlds from
which dance is born.
MuS100 Music Appreciation (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to music as an art. It ac-
quaints students with musical masterpieces as well as
their styles and periods. Class sessions include lec-
tures, listening to music, and a variety of participatory
activities.
MuS105 Fundamentals of Music (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to the building mate-
rials of music and intended for students with little or
no musical background. Principal topics include staff
notation, scales and keys, rhythm and meter, intervals
and triads.
MuS106 university Chorus (3 credits)
This course involves a choral ensemble that includes
study, rehearsal, and concert performance of choral
literature of various periods and styles. In addition,
the group participates in school and off-campus
performances, as well as appearances in the weekly
on-campus chapel services.
MuS120 Introduction to Music (3 credits)
As an introductory course in the music of western cul-
ture for non-music majors, this course is designed to
develop music reading and related aural skills through
practice and application of sight reading techniques
and ear training procedures.
MuS210 Introduction to Church Music (3 cred-
its)
This course is intended to provide a broad overview
of church music. It includes studies regarding the
Biblical basis for the use of music in the church, and
principles and practice for such use. This course is
designed to provide foundational understanding of
music ministry for Christians preparing for vocational
and lay ministry.
PED101/102 Physical Education I, II (3 credits)
This course introduces concepts for personal devel-
opment in health-related fitness and physical skills;
these include cardiovascular exercise, body compo-
sition, strength, endurance, and flexibility. Students
will develop physical and health-related fitness skills
through participation in individual and field activities.
inTerCULTUrAL sTUdies
ICS104 Survey of the World Religions (3 credits)
This course is a survey of the living tradition of 4 ma-
jor religions of the world, which are Islam, Buddhism,
Hindu, and a Chinese religion other than Christianity.
ICS205 Intercultural Communication (3 credits)
This course focuses on the foundational principles of
intercultural communication from the fields of social
psychology, cultural anthropology, and communica-
tion theory, integrated with selected areas of person-
al encounter in cross-cultural settings.

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PEM200 Introduction to Sports Mission (3 credits)
This is an introductory study to promote athletic pro-
gram or sports to become effective tools for a mis-
sion. The study will briefly survey the roles of sports
and athletic programs in the mission field history. The
main focus of this study is to develop student-athlete
into mission leaders.
MIS210 Mission Perspectives (3 credits)
This course surveys the history, theology, and strategy
of the global advance of the gospel. Specific instanc-
es of the growth of the Christian movement in select-
ed areas of the world are examined.
MIS220 History of Christian Mission (3 credits)
This course is a study of the expansion of Christianity
from Pentecost to the present. Particular attention
is given to an examination of the modern Protestant
mission movement.
MIS250 Foundation of Evangelism (3 credits)
This course develops in students a biblical and theo-
logical understanding of evangelism and a life-style
evangelism related to mission. Students will learn
communicating principles in order to reach the un-
reached.
MIS300 Survey of new Religious Movements (3
credits)
This course is a historical and sociological survey of
the origin and growth of new religious movements,
with particular attention given to Mormonism, Jeho-
vah’s Witnesses, Modern Paganism, and New Age.
Special attention is given to comparing and contrast-
ing new religious movements with the historic Chris-
tian faith.
MIS310 Mission and Biblical Worldview (3 credits)
This course studies the biblical basis of missions and
its principles; examines God’s purpose in missions in
the life of the local church and students; and a pan-
orama of the history of missions. Through this study,
students will understand and develop biblical world
perspectives and life styles, including examination of
major world views.
MIS320 Holy Spirit and Mission (3 credits)
The purpose of the course is to explore the dynamics
of the work of the Holy Spirit and mission in relation
to the following dimensions: personal, biblical, histor-
ical, contextual and functional. Students are encour-
aged to explore their ministry/mission philosophy re-
garding the role of the Spirit of God for their mission
context.
MIS330 Biblical Foundation of Mission (3 credits)
This course reviews perspectives in both Old and
New Testaments on the mission of God that touches
the nations under the rubric of the Kingdom of God.
MIS350 urban Mission (3 credits)
This course is a study of the nature and methods of
the Christian mission as they apply to the develop-
ment and implementation of a mission strategy for
the urban church, as well as the training of individuals
for outreach in the urban community.
MIS400 Mission in Postmodern World (3 credits)
This course is an in-depth examination of the effects
of cultural change in five key areas that directly af-
fect Christian mission and theology, including postin-
dustrial technology, post-literate communication,
postmodern philosophies, post-colonial politics, and
post-orthodox spiritualities.
Prerequisite: ISM250

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ISM250 Introduction to the Christian Mission (3
credits)
This is an introductory course to the mission of the
church, with attention to the biblical foundations of
mission, its historical developments, socio-cultural
context, methodological implementation, identifica-
tion of current issues confronting the church in mis-
sion, and the growth in ecumenism.
ISM320 Leadership and Community Development (3
credits)
Students will learn key features of developing lead-
ers and ministry teams within the church. Also, the
course will explore the theology and ideology of
community organizing, offer training in community
organizing techniques, and include the opportunity
to visit community organizing projects and develop a
particular organizing campaign.
ISM400 World Religions: Belief and Practices (3
credits)
This course is a study of the religious perspectives in
human experience, and their bearing on the advoca-
cy of the acceptance or rejection of the Gospel. It fo-
cuses on Christian evangelism in relation to religious
beliefs and practices.
LANGUAGE/WRITING/COMMUNI-
CATION
COMM101 Introduction to Communication (3 cred-
its)
This course surveys the theories of communication
relevant to all contexts. It introduces students to es-
sential concepts and fundamental theories that de-
scribe the process, function, natures, and effects of
communication.
COMM102 Public Presentations (3 credits)
An introduction to the preparation, presentation,
and evaluation of basic speech experiences for small
groups, meetings, and mass audiences. The integra-
tion of content, physical performance and presen-
tation technology is stressed. This course employs
peer and ultimately, instructor evaluations that are
based on organization of ideas, development and
support of a thesis, verbal and visual aesthetics, and
performance.
EnG101 English Grammar (3 credits)
This course reviews the fundamentals of English
grammar and composition, including parts of speech,
sentence structure, standard grammatical usage,
punctuation, and thesis and paragraph development.
The students will be introduced to the basics of col-
lege level writing.
EnG102 English Composition (3 credits)
This course will provide students with the skills of
written expression in the English language. It covers
literary models of composition and affords practice in
various forms of writing. Designed to develop clarity,
correctness, and effectiveness in written expression,
the rules learned in English are put into practice by
writing a course thesis. Prerequisite: ENG101
EnG103 Theological English I (3 credits)
This course is designed so students can familiarize
themselves with the original theological books in
English. While the students will review Basic English
grammar and composition, they will be able to com-
prehend the deep structure of the complicated sen-
tences.

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EnG104 Theological English II (3 credits)
This course sequence builds upon ENG103 and is
designed to improve skills relating to oral and writ-
ten communication, theme organization, and read-
ing comprehension, including skills related to public
speaking, effective writing, and academic research in
theological settings.
Prerequisite: ENG103
FLC101/102 Chinese I, II (6 credits)
This is an overview course that provides coordinat-
ed practice in the four skills of listening, speaking,
reading, and writing, as well as additional insight into
Chinese culture and society. Throughout this course,
integrated Chinese builds on the three modes of
communication – interactive, interpersonal, and pre-
sentational - to establish proficiency in using the Chi-
nese language in real-life situations.
(FLC101 prerequisite for FLC102)
FLG151/152 Elementary Biblical Greek I, II (6 cred-
its)
This course is a study of the grammar and syntax of
the Greek New Testament. The first semester covers
the essentials of grammar and the development of
a basic working vocabulary. In the second semester,
the students are introduced to the fundamental tasks
of exegesis and textual criticism and will translate
selected New Testament texts, practice exegetical
methods, and do introductory grammatical layouts.
(FLG151 prerequisite for FLG152)
FLH141/142 Elementary Biblical Hebrew I, II (6 cred-
its)
This course is a study of the basic principles of pho-
nology, morphology, and syntax of Biblical Hebrew.
The course will include translation and analysis of se-
lected portions of the Hebrew Bible.
(FLH141 prerequisite for FLH142)
FLJ101/102 Japanese I, II (6 credits)
This course is an introductory course in modern Jap-
anese with emphasis on speaking, listening, reading
and writing. It focuses on developing skills in pro-
ducing and comprehending modern Japanese. The
goal of the course is to master fundamental linguistic
forms and function of Japanese. Evaluation is based
on a student’s performance in class, homework as-
signments, quizzes and tests. There are daily home-
work assignments and frequent quizzes. (FLJ101 pre-
requisite for FLJ102)
FLk101/102 korean I, II (6 credits)
This is an overview course that provides coordinat-
ed practice in the four skills of listening, speaking,
reading, and writing, as well as additional insight into
Korean culture and society. Throughout this course,
integrated Korean builds on the three modes of com-
munication – interactive, interpersonal, and presen-
tational - to establish proficiency in using the Korean
language in real-life situations. (FLK151 prerequisite
for FLK152)
FLS101/102 Spanish I, II (6 credits)
Focusing on the fundamental skills of listening,
speaking, reading and writing, today’s Spanish speak-
ing countries are introduced in context. From the
first day of class, the emphasis is on communication
in Spanish, both in speaking and in writing. At the
end of this two-semester sequence, the actively par-
ticipating students will have a firm grounding in the
principles of Spanish grammar and a basic oral profi-
ciency in the language.
(FLS101 prerequisite for FLS102)

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LAW, POLITICS, ECONOMICS, AND
LEADERSHIP
POL101 Introduction to Political Science (3 credits)
This course is a survey of concepts and theories of
politics and government, including an examination of
some of the enduring questions of conflict and coop-
eration within and between nation states.
RLA105 Justice among nations (3 credits)
This course looks at theoretical & practical issues in
international economic justice. Students will exam-
ine the applicability of theories of justice to a world
of sovereign states & explore the relation of justice to
national security & world order. Special topics: New
International Economic Order, Development Assis-
tance, Human Rights & Basic Needs, and Technology
Transfer.
RLA110 American Public Policy and Religious Free-
dom (3 credits)
This course studies U.S. domestic policy, with special
attention to the religious freedom and the politics of
national policy in economy, social welfare, and the
environment.
The study also includes the stages of the policy pro-
cess: agenda-building, formation, budgeting, imple-
mentation, and evaluation.
RLA120 Civil Rights and Black Consciousness Move-
ments (3 credits)
This course is a social and religious history of the Afri-
can-American struggle for citizenship rights and free-
dom from World War II to the present.
ECOn101 Principles of Economics (Fundamentals
and Micro) (3 credits)
This course focuses on basic economic problems
leading to labor divisions in society and economic
systems; mechanisms, concepts and theories of micro
and macroeconomics in consumption, production,
savings and investment of government and private
sectors; analysis of the relationships and equilibrium
of various markets of both closed and open econo-
mies; and general guidelines for dealing with basic
economic problems.
LDS101 Developing the Healthy Leader (3 credits)
The students will analyze issues of the soul (mind,
emotions and will). This analysis will be accomplished
by examining their emotions, their perceptions, their
beliefs, the scriptures, and scientific studies. Addi-
tionally, the students will study how a healthy lead-
er’s thoughts and actions are manifested in practical
principles.
LDS102 Leadership and Interpersonal Relationship
(3 credits)
This course is an introduction to the fundamental
concepts of leadership. Emphasis is placed on the
understanding of individual and group behavior in
organizations, with special emphasis on typical inter-
personal and leadership relationships.
LDS105 Life and Time Management of a Leader (3
credits)
The objective of this course is to learn how to man-
age time effectively by improving personal organiza-
tion skills and planning and prioritizing tasks in line
with achieving leadership qualities.
LDS300 Biblical Perspective on Leadership (3 cred-
its)
In this survey course, students explore both historical
and contemporary leadership theories and models.

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Particular emphasis is placed on evaluating leader-
ship theories from a biblical perspective. Students
are also introduced to the concepts of worldview, cul-
ture, paradigms, and the effects that such concepts
have on leadership practices.
LDS310 Leadership in Cross-Cultural Context (3
credits)
The course explores the integration of the principles
and practices of Christian leadership for cross-cultural
ministry. Major issues in leadership will be examined
from the lives of biblical characters, such as Joseph,
Moses, Ruth, Esther, Ezra and Daniel, in a cross-cul-
tural context to determine appropriate types of ac-
tion for contemporary Christian leaders.
MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCES
BIO101 Topics in Biology (3 credits)
This course is designed to introduce the non-science
major to the major principles in biology and then to
utilize these principles to discuss science-related con-
cerns of today’s society.
CHEM110 Contemporary Chemistry (3 credits)
This course is a study of the fundamental principles
of chemistry, chemical activity of elements and com-
pounds, principles of organic chemistry, and princi-
ples of biochemistry. Material to be studied includes
problems of the environment, energy, population, air
pollution, water pollution, solid wastes, pesticides,
food additives, and drugs. Consideration is given to
the moral, ethical, and political implications in mak-
ing decisions concerning these problems.
CSI110 Basic Computers and Microsoft Applications
(3 credits)
This course is an introduction to computers, high-
lighting their use in management and the concepts
of computer software, hardware, and systems analy-
sis. Applications will include electronic spreadsheets,
database management software, and other special
purpose tools. Word processing tools will be used
for most graded assignments. Programming will be
studied in the context of spreadsheet macros.
MAT101 College Algebra (3 credits)
This is an introductory course to the nature of mathe-
matics as a logical system. The structure of the num-
ber system is developed and extended by logical rea-
soning to cover essential algebraic topics: algebraic
expression, functions, and the theory of equations.
MAT102 Probability (3 credits)
This course focuses on the theory of probability.
Topics include sample spaces, combinatory, axioms
and rules of probability, conditional probability and
independence, discrete and continuous random vari-
ables, mathematical expectation, and the moment
generating function.
Prerequisite: MAT101
MAT103 Statistics (3 credits)
This course covers the basic topics of applied statis-
tics, including the sample mean and variance, ran-
dom variables, elementary finite probability, the bi-
nomial and normal distributions, sampling, point and
interval estimation, control charts, and hypothesis
testing, as they apply in business situations. Prereq-
uisites: MAT101
MAT151 Calculus I (3 credits)
This course provides students with expanded func-
tions with applications, and an introduction to differ-

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ential calculus, with a laboratory component. Topics
include a review of algebra and functions, mathe-
matical modeling with elementary functions, rates of
changes, inverse functions, logarithms and exponen-
tial functions, the derivative, and differential equa-
tions. Prerequisite: MAT101
PHY101 Survey of Physics (3 credits)
This course is concerned with an introduction to the
fundamental laws underlying physics and has gener-
al application in other areas of science. Mechanics
and thermodynamics are treated quantitatively with a
special emphasis on problem solving.
PHY191 Physics in Modern Technology (3 credits)
This course is to expose the student to the history
of physics starting with the Greeks up to today. Ma-
jor contributions of scientists through the years and
showing how they contributed to the evolution of
physics are discussed.
PRACTICAL THEOLOGY AND
MINISTRY
PCC300 Pastoral Care and Listening (3 credits)
This is an introductory course where special attention
is given to psychological and theological aspects of
basic human needs of having a deep yearning to be
understood as well as perspectives on pastoral care
with empathic listening. While this course integrates
theoretical aspects of listening, practice of pastoral
care, verbatim writing, presentation, peer evaluation
as well as group dynamics, the course is designed to
help participants to grow in the area of self-aware-
ness, along with his/her capacity to contribute to
caring ministries and relationships in general. The
primary goal of the course is to help pastors or pas-
toral care givers who want to grow in the area of lis-
tening; however, the course can also be useful for lay
people who want to establish better relationship with
their family members, friends and neighbors with in-
creased capacity to listen.
PT230 Public Speech as Preaching (3 credits)
This course is an introductory study of speech and
communication including various methods of sermon
development which expounds a biblical text in an ac-
curate and effective manner. The ability to communi-
cate effectively is important in all areas of life. One of
the goals of this course is the development of basic
oral communication skills to give the student confi-
dence in extemporaneous speaking giving their tes-
timony, presenting a devotional message, delivering
a sermon, etc. It is designed to equip the student in
the preparation of the development and delivery of
public speech and sermons.
PT250 Discipleship and Evangelism (3 credits)
This course is a practicum with attention given to the
way Christian disciples are developed, with practical
guidelines for implementing discipleship and evan-
gelism, both as a personal lifestyle and within the
context of the local church.
PT410 Christian Worship and Liturgy (3 credits)
This course is introductory to the history, theology,
and practice of Christian worship and its Liturgy. This
involves the Sunday gatherings, sacraments, wed-
dings, funerals, and daily prayers.

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SOCIETY AND PERSONALITY
SCIENCES
PSY101 Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
This entry-level course studies the contributions of
modern psychology to the Christian’s perspective of
man. The course will focus on the pastor’s responsi-
bility in counseling. It covers the psychological prin-
ciples that underlay human behavior and students
will develop skills in understanding people.
SOC101 Introduction to Sociology (3 credits)
This course explains the social organization, institu-
tions, and social forces within our society. It evaluates
the problems of society, including social deviance, ur-
ban growth, drug addiction, and adjustment to social
changes.
RS105 Sociology of Religion (3 credits)
With an introduction to sociology, this course will ex-
amine the meaning of religion as a dimension of so-
cial life: religion, myth, and symbolic reality; churches
as organizations and institutions; the social identity of
the faithful; secularization and revival.
RS115 Race and Ethnic Relations (3 credits)
This course provides a sociological perspective on in-
tergroup relations between different ethnic groups.
Cultural based differences regarding communication
styles, lifestyles, and ideology are explored, as well
as the mechanisms of discrimination as they influence
power structures inhibiting equality. The history and
current experiences of some of the ethnic groups
represented in the United States are examined.
RS230 Jesus, Then and now (3 credits)
Students will learn Jesus’ moral teaching concerning
the Kingdom of God in comparison to social ethics
in a postmodern world. Also, students learn about
Jesus’ self-declaration of his role and duty towards
secular society in the 1stcentury. The course will
methodologically examine Jesus’ spirit of God and
human life, and how Christians realize Jesus’ teaching
of ethics effectively to real society through a soterio-
logical point of view. various types of Jesus’ spiritual
criteria of the 1st century, including modern society,
will be used to give an easier understanding of the
movement of the Kingdom of God..
RPS105 Marriage and Family (3 credits)
This course focuses on the characteristics of problem
areas and their solutions in courtship and marriage.
It covers the social and economic problems of the
American family, the relations of parents with chil-
dren, and the relations between home and church.
The course uses a case study approach.
RPS110 Science and Religion (3 credits)
An interdisciplinary investigation of the inter-relation
and cross-influence of religion and science in history.
This course will examine the ambiguous relationship
of religion and science, not only in Western culture
but in other culture surrounded by diverse religions.
It seeks to introduce the historical/intellectual conflict
of religion and science in the modern period, as well
as to possible resolutions of that conflict. Particular
attention will begin given to interpret the conflict be-
tween religion and science.
RPS112 Psychology of Religious Experience (3 cred-
its)
This is an introductory course designed to help stu-
dents understand the many forms of religious expe-
rience with a survey of various theoretical, empirical,
and clinical literatures on religion.

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RPS115 Personality and Morality (3 credits)
This course is designed to explore human personal-
ity and its characteristics in human nature. Further-
more, this course tries to find a methodology that
can help society respect diverse cultural and social
circumstances with specific ethological identities. In
this course you will learn about the development of
human nature and personality through scholars’ vari-
ous ethical, psychological, and sociological theories,
which includes socio-scientific traditions in postmod-
ernism. Ultimately you will be exposed to a wide
range of theories in this course that will inform your
understanding of human nature.
RPS120 Stress Management (3credits)
This course is designed to provide basic information
and knowledge about human stress as well as diverse
ways of coping with it so that students can employ
them in their real life situations. As long as human be-
ings are alive, there is no way to eradicate stress. In
fact, stress is something that is often related to sur-
vival, and even animals experience it when they face
threats to their well-being. Capacity to feel stress is
something that is important for human beings and
animals alike in a way of helping them to recognize
threats as well live their full lives. The problem, how-
ever, is that the much portions of stress that human
beings experience nowadays is not eustress (good
stress) but distress. Studies now indicate that be-
tween 70 and 80 percent of all disease is strongly re-
lated to stress; cancer and coronary heart disease are
good examples. Under this context, the purpose of
this course is to help students to learn how to identify
their stressors and cope with them effectively even
in the midst of demanding life tasks, problems, and
ongoing challenges.
HIS130 History of America I (3 credits)
This course is a survey on the historical development
of United States of America, starting with the thirteen
colonies and movement West. The course surveys
the relationship of ideas, geography, borders, immi-
gration, culture, economies and the military to the
expression of US in the world.
HIS131 History of America II (3 credits)
This course is an introductory survey of the histori-
cal developments of the United States from the af-
termath of the Civil War to the presidency of Barack
Obama. The course seeks to encompass the ideo-
logical, political philosophical framework that served
as the foundation for the establishment of the world
superpower.
HIS150 History of Modern Business (3 credits)
The modern corporation has emerged as the dom-
inant form of doing business throughout the world.
This course looks at the history of the internation-
al corporation from the industrial revolution to the
present, to consider how corporations have evolved
and the varying ways in which they have influenced
the history of modern times. Much of the course will
involve an examination of case studies of individual
companies, industries or issues, to understand how
corporations have functioned in specific instances.
CSI130 Introduction to Social Media (3 credits)
This course will introduce students to the contexts
and forms of social media. What are social media,
who uses them, who gains from them, and how are
they transforming the media landscape and the way
we inhabit the world? Students will become familiar
with a range of social media tools, analyze and dis-
cuss their uses and implications, and develop their
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to explore both theory and practice of social media
through writing assignments, applied tasks, and a
course project. Students will also discover other
types of social media they may not have been aware
of and how to use them for their benefit—personally,
academically, and eventually professionally as well.
sysTemATiC And PHiLOsOPHiCAL
THeOLOGy
PHIL101 Introduction to Philosophy (3 credits)
This is an introductory course to the meaning & pur-
pose of philosophy, including its methodology &
goals. It also examines its relation to science, poetry,
& other human endeavors.
PHIL200 Ethics (3 credits)
The question of ethics or moral philosophy is: What is
the good? This course will study answers to the ques-
tion provided by great moral philosophers of history
such as Plato, Aristotle, and Kant, and it will examine
how these answers can be applied to moral issues rel-
evant today.
SPT200 Christian Perspective and Philosophical
Thought (3 credits)
This course is an introductory study in comparison
of Christian perspective and philosophical thought.
The study focuses on the different perspective and
thoughts in order to develop one’s own Christian per-
spective on life value and the world.
SPT201 Comparative Religion: Traditions (3 credits)
This course is an introductory survey of the world’s
religious traditions, with emphasis on cultural context
& historical development.
SPT210 Gandhi/Marx/niebuhr (3 credits)
This course provides an introduction to the social eth-
ics of Gandhi compared with that of Marx & Reinhold
Niebuhr. Emphasis is on cultural contents and con-
cepts of human nature, social change, utopian vision
& lifestyles. Students will analyze current situations
of personal, social & political conflict as case studies.
SPT300 Introduction to Systematic Theology (3
credits)
This course is an introduction to the contents, meth-
ods, and resources of Christian theology. Attention
will be given to the understanding of traditional and
contemporary formulations of Christian doctrines on
God, Christ, and the Holy Spirit, and to the under-
standing of Churches with a view to the clearest pos-
sible understanding of the Christian faith.
SPT310 Survey of Christian Ethics (3 credits)
This course is a study introducing the student to the
history of Christian ethical thought and to some of
the most important ethical questions facing the
church today.
Prerequisite: SPT300
SPT400 Topics in Contemporary Theology (3 credits)
A consideration of specific theologians and theologi-
cal movements within 20th-century Christian thought.
The course may include studies in neo-orthodoxy,
third world theologies, process theology, theologies
of hope, as well as consideration of the current evan-
gelical spectrum of thought and practice.
Prerequisite: SPT300

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UniversiTy COre
PT200 Life Journey in Faith (3 credits)
This course presents spiritual formation as an inten-
tional emphasis of the Church, whereby we seek to
facilitate and cooperate with the work of the Spirit of
God. This is accomplished primarily through cultivat-
ing a climate of discipleship, encouraging spiritual
practices that make us more open and responsive to
the Spirit’s activity, and developing resources that ad-
dress the varying needs of persons at different places
in their faith pilgrimage.
PT202 Life Journey Practicum (3 credits)
This course is mandatory for all non-religious major
students, and it serves as a practicum for PT200. Stu-
dents will take the values and principles learned in
Life Journey and apply it to real life situations through
community involvement and service. This study also
includes Employment Practicum and Career Planning
and Decision Making practicum.
Prerequisite(s): PT200.
PT203 Career Development (3 credit)
This course seeks to develop an understanding of
HR/employment practices as students develop prac-
tical skills to facilitate their individual success includ-
ing: writing effective resumes, preparing job search
correspondence, improving interview skills, network-
ing and j ob prospecting and using Internet resources
to land internships and jobs. This course is also de-
signed to help students in the process of exploring
and defining their career goals. This course explores
personal interest, values, and abilities; examines
methods of researching information on careers; and
applies decision-making models.
CRDV100 Employment Practicum (1 credit)
This course seeks to develop an understanding of
HR/employment practices as students develop prac-
tical skills to facilitate their individual success includ-
ing: writing effective resumes, preparing job search
correspondence, improving interview skills, network-
ing and job prospecting and using Internet resources
to land internships and jobs.
CRDV105 Career Planning and Decision Making (1
credit)
This course is designed to help students in the pro-
cess of exploring and defining their career goals. This
course explores personal interest, values, and abili-
ties; examines methods of researching information
on careers; and applies decision-making models.

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GrAdUATe PrOGrAms
MASTER OF ARTS IN THEOLOGICAL STUDIES (MATS)
MASTER OF DIVINITY (M.DIV)

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mAsTer Of ArTs in THeOLOGiCAL sTUdies
(mATs)
A. PrOGrAm OvervieW
The Master’s degree program in Theological Studies is for those who want to deepen their
understanding and engagement of the Bible; theological issues including multi-ethnic and
cross-cultural context; leadership and ministry skills in various context of the ministry; an-
alytical approach to the historical and contemporary issues in mission. The program will
challenge the student to think critically by examining historical, philosophical, ethical, and
practical theology.
It is designed for students who seek a terminal degree for a ministry of teaching theology in
Bible institutes, local churches or para-church organizations; pastors who perceive the need
to update and enrich their theological education to keep abreast of the ever-changing theo-
logical issues and movements in the contemporary world; and lay persons who desire to be
more effective in their local churches through an increased understanding of theology.
Faithful leadership in Christian ministry in general requires encountering the challenges of a
changing world in the manifold of issues derived from cultural, socioeconomic, political, and
spiritual realities and relationships with Jesus of Nazareth. Hudson Taylor’s masters of theo-
logical studies provide students with opportunities to be formed as non-ordained leaders in
church, society and any religious organization through academic excellence, critical reflec-
tion, and faithful witness.
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
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B. OBjeCTives
Understand the Scriptural basis, the essential content, historical development, and philo-
sophical, practical, and ethical dimensions of Christian theology.
Relate Christian perspective, theology, history, philosophy, and ethics to contemporary
and cross-cultural issues and Christian ministry.
Demonstrate enhanced understanding of and commitment to personal and social holi-
ness through practices of moral, personal and spiritual formation, in a context of account-
ability to a community of faith, and dependence on the leading of the Spirit of Christ.
1.
2.
3.
Graduates of MATS will be prepared to:
C. PrOGrAm reQUiremenTs
The students are required to complete successfully 48 credit hours, including one University
Core course. The ministry project courses devoted to work at local church mission field are
either optional or electives. In addition, the Master’s degree program requires Institutional
Requirements, a total of 4 non-credit “IR”s (Institutional Requirement) for two years. Each IR
is acquired by participating in the weekly chapel service for a semester. The MATS degree
program can be completed in two years of full-time study. It must be completed within four
years of matriculation into the program. Students will plan their course of studies with an
advisor.
If Master’s degree students want to write a thesis or to complete a project as part of the
MATS program rather than taking a 3 credit hour course, then the students will select a topic
in consultation with their advisor and then compose a thesis or project, which demonstrates
skill in research, exposition, and interpretation. The thesis or project presents the results of
graduate level research, presented in a publishable form. The thesis is traditionally presented
in written format, while the project may be presented to include non-written, performance, or
other non-traditional formats. Both the thesis and the project will demonstrate graduate level
abilities to pursue research, with skill in investigation, assessment, and expression. Informa-
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2. Theological studies electives: required 9 Credit Hours (3 courses)
Select three courses from the areas of Theology, Religion, Ethics, and Intercultural Studies
and Mission.
Theology/Religion/Ethics/Mission (Select Three, 9 credits)
Credit Hours
HPR502 Church History II (Reformation to Modern)
3
RS510 Society and Religion
3
RS530 Jesus and Contemporary Society
3
RS535 Christ and Culture
3
RS605 Philosophy of Christian Religion
3
SPT520 Philosophy and Theology
3
SPT553 Systematic Theology III: Ecclesiology and Eschatology
3
SPT560 Topics in Philosophy of Religion
3
SPT580 History of Christian Doctrine
3
SPT585 Theology of Martin Luther
3
SPT590 The Theology of Augustine
3
SPT610 Perspectives on Social Ethics
3
SPT620 The Doctrine of the Holy Spirit
3
PT600 Worship and Culture
3
ICS600 Postmodern Issues for Mission
3
TS701 Practicum I (Ministry Project I)
3
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1. Theological studies Core: required 21 Credit Hours (7 courses)
The students in this degree program must, at least, take one ministry project with three credit
hours as practicum.
Required Core Courses (Select Seven, 21 credits)
Bible/Theology/History/Ministry
Credit Hours
SPT550 Systematic Theology I
3
SPT555 Christian Ethics I
3
OT500 Introduction to the Old Testament
3
NT500 Introduction to the New Testament
3
HPR500 Church History
3
SPT552 Systematic Theology II
3
SPT582 Christian Apologetics
3

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TS702 Practicum II (Ministry Project II)
3
MA700 Thesis/Project (Optional)
3
3. General Core: required 18 Credit Hours (6 courses)
Select six courses from the following courses in the areas of Theology, Intercultural Studies
and Mission, Education, and Leadership including one University core.
Theology/Mission/Bible/Education/Ministry/Leadership
(Select Five, 15 credits)
Credit Hours
MIS500 Perspectives in Mission
3
MIS510 Fundamentals in Evangelism and Contextualization
3
MIS515 Biblical Theology of Mission
3
MIS530 Christianity and Worldviews
3
ICS510 Intercultural Communication in Multi-Ethnic Context
3
ICS580 Cross-Cultural Church Planting and Church Growth
3
ICS600 Postmodern Issues for Mission
3
RS550 Psychology of Religion
3
PCC500 Introduction to Pastoral Care and Listening
3
PCC540 Introduction to Marriage and Family Counseling
3
PT520 Introduction to Preaching and Communication
3
PT530 Christian Worship and Sacraments
3
PT550 Women in Ministry
3
PT560 Developing Children’s Ministry
3
PT580 Introduction to Church Planting
3
RCE500 Fundamentals of Christian Education
3
RCE600 Human Development and Educational Ministry
3
RCE610 Teaching/Learning Methods
3
RS510 Society and Religion
3
SPT580 History of Christian Doctrine
3
SPT582 Christian Apologetics
3
BS540 Biblical Hermeneutics
3
BS550 Holy Land Project
3
LDS500 Leadership and Inter-Relationship
3
LDS510 Leadership Development for Ministry
3
LDS550 Diversity and Cultural Leadership
3
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university Core (Select One, 3 credits)
Credit Hours
PT501 Life Journey in Faith
3
4. institutional requirement (“ir”): required 4
Students are required to complete one non-credit “IR” each semester in chapel. Four semes-
ter “IR”s are required for graduation.
d. sUGGesTed COUrse seQUenCinG
Students are required to have a consultation with an advisor in planning their course of study,
selecting courses each semester to meet the program and curriculum requirements, and
meeting individual goals. The following suggested course sequencing is provided as recom-
mended courses over eight semesters to meet the program requirements and complete the
program within eight semesters of full time enrollment. An individual student’s course plan
may differ, if in consultation with the advisor, alternate courses are selected to complete the
program requirements. Those courses must be approved for the curriculum, as documented
in the Catalog.
First Semester
Credit Hours
SPT550 Systematic Theology I
3
SPT555 Christian Ethics
3
OT500 Introduction to the Old Testament
3
Select One from Theology/Mission/Bible/Education/Ministry/Leadership
3
Institutional Requirement
Total 12
Second Semester
Credit Hours
HPR500 Church History
3
NT500 Introduction to the New Testament
3
SPT552 Systematic Theology II
3
Select One from Theology/Mission/Bible/Education/Ministry/Leadership
3
Institutional Requirement
Total 12
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Third Semester
Credit Hours
Select One from Theological Studies Electives
3
Select Two from Theology/Mission/Bible/Education/Ministry/Leadership
6
PT501 Life Journey in Faith
3
Institutional Requirement
Total 12
Fourth Semester
Credit Hours
Select Two from Theological Studies Electives
6
Select One from Theology/Mission/Bible/Education/Ministry/Leadership
3
SPT582 Christian Apologetics
3
Institutional Requirement
Total 12
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However, I consider my life worth nothing to me, if only I may fin-
ish the race and complete the task the Lord Jesus has given me--the
task of testifying to the gospel of God’s grace.
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I lift up my eyes to the
hills-- where does my help come
from?
My help comes from the
LORD, the Maker of heaven
and earth.
He will not let your foot
slip-- he who watches over you
will not slumber;
indeed, he who watches over
Israel will neither
slumber nor sleep.
The LORD watches over you--
the LORD is your shade at your
right hand;
the sun will not harm you by
day, nor the moon by night.
The LORD will keep you from
all harm-- he will watch over
your life;
the LORD will watch over your
coming and going both now
and forevermore.
Psalms 121
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mAsTer Of diviniTy (m.div)
A. PUrPOse
The Master of Divinity degree program at Hudson Taylor University is a professional and ba-
sic theological program to prepare men and women for Christian ministry, whether in local
church settings, chaplaincy expressions, para-church contexts, or mission abroad. It is de-
signed to equip students with the skills and imagination needed to lead the people of God
effectively in formal ministry. The main purpose of the program is to equip and train those
who feel called to prepare the saints for works of service and to build the body of Christ.
Faithful leadership in Christian ministry in general requires encountering the challenges of a
changing world in the multiple of issues derived from cultural, socioeconomic, political, and
spiritual realities and relationships with Jesus of Nazareth. Hudson Taylor’s Master of Divinity
program provides students with opportunities to be trained as mission-minded, theologically
firm, and Christ-centered servants of God to minister to the people. It is designed to enable
students to focus on shaping a Christ-like Character through the Bible, acting in Mission
through Life, and building as a Global-Minded Leader.
The M. Div. degree program at Hudson Taylor provides a network for the procession of or-
dained leaders in Christian ministry. It requires a foundational study and competence in the
areas of interrelated disciplines: (1) Biblical Studies, which encompasses the content and con-
texts of the Old and New Testament Scriptures, with the requirement of learning Hebrew and
Greek, (2) Church History, which includes learning from the accumulated wisdom and chal-
lenges of previous generations of the Christian community, and Theology with the system-
atic study and articulation of the Christian faith, (3) Practical Theology and Pastoral Ministry,
which includes the acquisition of needed skills and the development of ministry competence,
(4) Christian Education and Leadership, which includes nourishing and building the body of
Christ and the community of Faith, and (5) Inter-Cultural Studies and Missions with action in
mission through life for expanding the Kingdom of God.
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B. OBjeCTives
C. PrOGrAm reQUiremenTs
Graduates of M Div. will be prepared to:
Students are required to successfully complete 90 credit hours, including two supervised
ministry project courses devoted to work at a local church ministry, and one University Core
course. In addition, the M Div. degree program requires the completion of Institutional Re-
quirements, a total of six non-credit “IR”s (Institutional Requirement) for three years. Each IR
is acquired by participating in the weekly chapel service for a semester. This degree program
is designed to be completed in three years of full-time study, or in four or more years of part-
time study. It must be, however, completed within six years of matriculation into the program.
Students will plan their courses of study with an advisor.
The curriculum of the Master of Divinity program provides a balanced focus on traditional
and interrelated disciplines (Biblical Studies, Church History and Theology, Practical Theology
and Christian Ministry, Christian Education and Leadership, and Inter-Cultural Studies and
Missions). Thus M Div. students will receive broad preparation for and comprehensive under-
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Understand the Scriptural basis, the essential content, historical development, and
philosophical, practical, spiritual, and ethical dimensions of Christian theology and
faith in serving Christian ministry.
Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the foundational disciplines: Biblical
Studies, Church History and Theology, Practical Theology and Pastoral Ministry, Chris-
tian Education and Leadership, and Inter-Cultural Studies and Missions.
Competently serve the church or the community of faith with a servant leadership life-
style with Christian perspective, theology, history, philosophy, and ethics in diverse and
cross-cultural contexts of the contemporary world for Christian ministry.
Commit themselves to the mission of God in their lives by integrating the theological
disciplines and content acquired through the studies with discernment, ethical deci-
sion making, and spiritual wisdom in their ministry context.
Foster a ministerial leadership by committing to personal and social holiness through
practices of moral, personal, and spiritual development, in a context of accountability
to a community of faith, and dependence on the guidance of the Spirit of Christ.
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standing of effective Christian ministry in a variety of settings.
The students seeking ordination are required to have an established working relationship with
the appropriate ecclesiastical body in order to be certified as ministerial candidates, or they
should go through the process through the responsible governing bodies of their denomina-
tions. They should also plan to meet ordination requirements as well as service in chaplaincy
programs (military, hospital, and others) according to the policy of their denomination.
General standards for admission to the Divinity School at Hudson Taylor University may be
found in the section of admission policies and procedures in the Hudson Taylor catalog. To
be admitted to the M. Div. program, students must meet the standards for a graduate pro-
gram. As an essential part of the admission process, an applicant must furnish a letter of
endorsement from a pastor of one’s home church. In addition, the candidate must submit
two additional letters of reference from persons in a position to assess his or her qualifications
for the M. Div. program. One of the admission processes is for the candidate to take a Bible
content exam. The successful applicant must pass it either before admission or later by tak-
ing it again before graduation.
Supervised Ministry practicum courses are designed for the student to have an opportunity to
hone ministry skills in his or her area of specific interest and to build a ministerial leadership.
Students are required to complete two Supervised Ministry Practicums courses. Thus stu-
dents will complete one-year of supervised ministry rounds to increase their self-awareness,
skill sets, a life of leadership and service, and competence based on a healthy theological
self-identity. Students should complete Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) in an appropriate
setting approved by the M.Div. director in an intensive ministry experience, and transfer the
credits to Hudson Taylor University. The Divinity school will grant it to three credits for a unit
of CPE.
A spiritual training emphasis is integrated throughout the curriculum by faculty who seek to
live their faith and theology. The university core course is a model for this purpose and to
build the community of faith as one body. The M.Div. program provides the opportunity for
personal and professional transformation as leaders who serve the triune God and the church
to change the world with a servant leadership.
If Master degree students want to write a thesis or to complete a project as part of the M
Div. program rather than take a 3 credit hour course, then the students will select a topic in
consultation with their advisor and then compose a thesis or project, which demonstrates
skill in research, exposition, and interpretation. The thesis or project presents the results of
graduate level research, presented in a publishable form. The thesis is traditionally presented
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in written format, while the project may be presented to include non-written, performance, or
other non-traditional formats. Both the thesis and the project will demonstrate graduate level
abilities to pursue research, with skill in investigation, assessment, and expression. Informa-
tion on the MA Thesis and Project Guidelines are available upon request.
d. reQUiremenTs fOr GrAdUATiOn
The School of Divinity will confer the Master of Divinity degree on students who complete 90
credit hours in the program with a minimum cumulative 2.5 grade point average, have met
the requirements for graduation including Bible Content Exam pass grade and six non-credit
“IR”s, have been recommended by the faculty, and are approved by the Advisory Committee.
1. Biblical studies Courses: required 27 Credit Hours (9 courses)
The students in this degree program must take two Biblical language courses with six credit
hours both Biblical Greek and Biblical Hebrew course.
required Core Courses (6 courses, 18 credits)
Bible
Credit Hours
BSL601 Biblical Hebrew
3
BSL605 Biblical Greek
3
BS540 Biblical Hermeneutics
3
OT500 Introduction to the Old Testament
3
NT500 Introduction to the New Testament
3
NT550 Theology of the New Testament
3
required Core Course (select One, 3 credits)
Credit Hours
Select one from either Old Testament or New Testament
OT600 Old Testament Reading and Exegesis
3
Or
NT600 New Testament Reading and Exegesis
3
Biblical studies electives: required 6 Credit Hours (2 courses)
Select two courses from Biblical Studies courses except core courses indicated by an asterisk
mark.
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foundations of the Bible
Credit Hours
BS510 History of Israel
3
BS520 Background of the New Testament World
3
BS530 Bible Land Geography and Biblical Archaeology
3
BS540 Biblical Hermeneutics*
3
BS550 Holy Land Project
3
BS560 Issues in Biblical Interpretation
3
BS580 Inter-Testamental Period and Rise of Early Christianity
3
BS600 Apocalyptic Literature: Daniel, Enoch, etc.
3
BS610 Biblical Characters and Leadership
3
BSL601 Biblical Hebrew*
3
BSL605 Biblical Greek*
3
Old Testament
Credit Hours
OT500 Introduction to the Old Testament*
3
OT502 Pentateuch
3
OT503 Historical Books
3
OT504 Major Prophets
3
OT505 Minor Prophets
3
OT506 Wisdom Literature
3
OT550 Theology of the Old Testament*
3
OT600 Old Testament Reading and Exegesis*
3
OT601 Genesis
3
OT605 Nehemiah and Ezra
3
OT606 Psalms as Literature & Spirituality
3
OT610 Reading of Prophets: Jeremiah, Isaiah, etc.
3
new Testament
Credit Hours
NT500 Introduction to the New Testament*
3
NT502 Synoptic Gospels
3
NT503 Gospel of John and Johannine Epistles
3
NT504 Pauline Literature
3
NT505 General Epistles
3
NT540 Jesus and the Kingdom of God
3
NT550 Theology of the New Testament*
3
NT560 Use of Old Testament in the New Testament
3
NT570 Christology in the New Testament
3
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NT600 New Testament Reading and Exegesis*
3
NT601 Romans
3
NT604 Luke and Acts of the Apostles
3
NT605 I & II Corinthians
3
NT606 Letter of James and Jude
3
NT610 Parables of Jesus
3
NT620 Gospel as a Story (Mark, Matthew, Luke, and John)
3
NT650 Miracle Stories
3
NT655 Pauline Theology
3
NT660 Book of Revelation
3
NT665 Soteriology of St. Paul
3
2. Theology and History Courses: required 18 Credit Hours (6 courses)
required Core Courses (5 courses, 15 credits)
Theology/History
Credit Hours
SPT550 Systematic Theology
3
SPT552 Systematic Theology II
3
SPT555 Christian Ethics
3
HPR500 Church History
3
HPR502 Church History II (Reformation to Modern)
3
elective Course: required 3 Credit Hours (1 course)
Select one course from the areas of Theology and History.
Theology/History (select One, 3 credits)
Credit Hours
RS510 Society and Religion
3
RS530 Jesus and Contemporary Society
3
RS535 Christ and Culture
3
RS550 Psychology of Religion
3
RS605 Philosophy of Christian Religion
3
SPT520 Philosophy and Theology
3
SPT553 Systematic Theology III: Ecclesiology and Eschatology
3
SPT560 Topics in Philosophy of Religion
3
SPT580 Christian Doctrine
3
SPT582 Christian Apologetics
3
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SPT585 Theology of Martin Luther
3
SPT590 The Theology of Augustine
3
SPT610 Perspectives on Social Ethics
3
SPT620 The Doctrine of the Holy Spirit
3
3. Practical Theology and ministry Courses: required 24 Credit Hours
(8 courses)
required Core Courses (5 courses, 15 credits)
Practical Theology/ministry
Credit Hours
PCC500 Introduction to Pastoral Care and Counseling
3
PCC700 Clinical Pastoral Education, Unit I
3
PT520 Introduction to Preaching and Communication
3
PT530 Christian Worship and Sacraments
3
PT540 Church Polity
3
elective Course: required 3 Credit Hours (1 course)
Practical Theology/ministry (select One, 3 credits)
Credit Hours
PCC600 Pastoral Counseling with Couples and Families
3
PT525 Narrative Preaching
3
PT535 Church Administration
3
PT545 Liturgy and Dynamics in Worship
3
PT550 Women in Ministry
3
PT560 Developing Children’s Ministry
3
PT580 Introduction to Church Planting
3
PT600 Worship and Culture
3
required supervised ministry Practicum Courses (2 courses, 6 credits) Credit Hours
The students in this degree program must take two ministry projects with six credit hours as supervised
ministry practicums.
SM701 Supervised Ministry Practicum I
3
SM702 Supervised Ministry Practicum II
3
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4. Christian Education and Leadership Courses: Required 9 Credit Hours
(3 courses)
required Core Courses (3 courses, 9 credits)
Christian education/Leadership (select Three)
Credit Hours
RCE500 Foundation of Christian Education
3
RCE510 Philosophy of Christian Education
3
RCE520 Church’s Educational Ministry
3
RCE550 The Bible and Christian Education
3
RCE570 Christian Education in Multi-Cultural Context
3
RCE580 Christian Education and Psychology
3
RCE600 Human Development and Educational Ministry
3
RCE610 Teaching/Learning Methods
3
LDS500 Leadership and Inter-Relationship
3
LDS510 Leadership Development for Ministry
3
LDS520 Biblical Leadership and Characters
3
LDS550 Diversity and Cultural Leadership
3
LDS600 Time Management and Ministry
3
LDS610 Pastoral Coaching
3
5. Inter-Cultural Studies Courses: Required 6 Credit Hours
(2 courses)
required Core Courses (2 courses, 6 credits)
inter-Cultural studies and missions (select Two)
Credit Hours
MIS500 Perspectives in Mission
3
MIS505 History of Korean Mission Movement
3
MIS510 Fundamentals in Evangelism and Contextualization
3
MIS515 Biblical Theology of Mission
3
MIS530 Christianity and Worldviews
3
ICS510 Intercultural Communication in Multi-Ethnic Context
3
ICS580 Cross-Cultural Church Planting and Church Growth
3
ICS600 Postmodern Issues for Mission
3
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I am with you and will watch over you wherever you go, and I will
bring you back to this land. I will not leave you until I have done
what I have promised you.”
Genesis 28:15
6. General Elective Course: Required 3 Credit Hours (1 course)
Select one course from the studies of the areas in Biblical Studies, Theology and History, Prac-
tical Theology and Ministry, Christian Education and Leadership, and Inter-Cultural Studies.
Thesis/Project
Credit Hours
MA700 Thesis/Project (Optional)
3
7. university Core Course: Required 3 Credit Hours (1 course)
University Core (select One, 3 credits)
Credit Hours
PT501 Life Journey in Faith
3
8. Institutional Requirement (“IR”): Required 6 non-credit IRs
Students are required to complete one non-credit “IR” (Institutional Requirement) per semes-
ter by participating in the weekly chapel service for three years. Six IRs as WS500 Institutional
Requirement are required for graduation.
d. sUGGesTed COUrse seQUenCinG
Students are required to meet with an advisor to plan their course of study and select courses
each semester in order to meet the program and curriculum requirements as well as to meet
individual goals. The following suggested course sequencing allows for all requirements to
be met and the program to be completed within eight semesters of full-time enrollment. An
individual student’s course plan may vary. In consultation with the advisor, alternate courses
outlined in the curriculum and the university catalog may be selected to complete the pro-
gram requirements.
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first semester
Credit Hours
SPT550 Systematic Theology
3
OT500 Introduction to the Old Testament
3
NT500 Introduction to the New Testament
3
BSL605 Biblical Greek
3
HPR500 Church History
3
Institutional Requirement
Total 15
second semester
Credit Hours
BSL601 Biblical Hebrew
3
HPR502 Church History II
3
PCC500 Introduction to Pastoral Care and Counseling
3
SPT552 Systematic Theology II: Christology and Soteriology
3
NT550 Theology of the New Testament
3
Institutional Requirement
Total 15
Third semester
Credit Hours
Select Two from Christian Education and Leadership
6
BS540 Biblical Hermeneutics
3
SPT555 Christian Ethics
3
PT520 Introduction to Preaching and Communication
3
Institutional Requirement
Total 15
fourth semester
Credit Hours
Select One from Theology and History
3
Select One from Inter-Cultural Studies and Missions
3
OT600 Old Testament Reading and Exegesis
3
Or
NT600 New Testament Reading and Exegesis
3
PT530 Christian Worship and Sacraments
3
Select One from Practical Theology and Ministry
3
Institutional Requirement
Total 15
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fifth semester
Credit Hours
PT501 Life Journey in Faith
3
Select One from Biblical Studies
3
Select One from Christian Education and Leadership
3
Select One from Inter-Cultural Studies and Missions
3
SM701 Supervised Ministry Practicum I
3
Institutional Requirement
Total 15
sixth semester
Credit Hours
Select One from Biblical Studies
3
One General Elective
3
PT540 Church Polity
3
PCC700 Clinical Pastoral Education, Unit I
3
SM702 Supervised Ministry Practicum II
3
Institutional Requirement
Total 15
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BiBLiCAL sTUdies
fOUndATiOns Of THe BiBLe
BS501 Bible Survey (3 credits)
This is a brief survey of the whole books in the Bible.
This introductory course offers the background and
content of the each writings in the Old and New Tes-
tament including a chronological overview and theo-
logical interpretation and application.
BS510 History of Israel (3 credits)
This course surveys the history and literature of Israel
from Abraham through the end of the Divided King-
dom and studies the socio-political-religious culture
which shapes the literature of this period. This study
includes Ancient Near Eastern history, literature and
culture which begin with the emergence of culture in
the Fertile Crescent. It also deals with important is-
sues such as the early formation of the canon and the
authority of the Old Testament scriptures, and pro-
vides insights from related geographical, historical,
and archaeological perspectives.
BS520 Background of the new Testament World (3
credits)
Knowledge of historical context is crucial to under-
standing the New Testament. This course investi-
gates politics, society, culture, philosophies, and reli-
gions of the Greco-Roman world of the time of Christ.
Attention is given to backgrounds of early Christian-
ity, history and archeology from the 2nd century B.C.
to the 2nd century A.D.
BS530 Bible Land Geography and Biblical Archaeol-
ogy (3 credits)
This is a study of the physical and historical geogra-
phy of Palestine as a necessary background to Old
Testament interpretation. Slides will be used to illus-
trate the terrain and topography.
BS540 Biblical Hermeneutics (3 credits)
A study of basic principles and specific guidelines
of interpretation some attention is given to the his-
torical schools of interpretation, but the focus of the
course is on historical-grammatical interpretation of
the Biblical narrative itself and legitimate application
of the Scriptures. General principles, such as reliance
on the Holy Spirit, biblical context, ancient culture,
and different literary genre are studies in this course.
Prerequisite: OT500 or NT500
BS550 Holy Land Project (3 credits)
This project studies the locations of Bible stories in
the Holy Land itself. This study includes cultural, his-
torical, geographical, and theological dimensions of
the Old Testament, New Testament, and the Church
through seminar lecture and travel to Holy Land. It
gives academic credit for a travel study tour with a
Biblical Studies Instructor. (The cost of the travel is
extra.)
BS560 Issues in Biblical Interpretation (3 cred-
its)
This course surveys the practice of interpretation
from the first century to the present, examines the
methods of interpretation for the different genres of
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the Old Testament and the New Testament, and ap-
plies the results of interpretation to worship, theolo-
gy, teaching, and spiritual formation.
BS580 Inter-Testamental Period and Rise of Early
Christianity (3 credits)
This course will overview its politics, history, and so-
ciety during the inter-testamental period from the
close of the Old Testament canon in the fifth century
B.C. to the first century AD until the formation of the
New Testament Writings. In particular, it focuses on
the literatures, religious thoughts, and theology that
influenced the development of Judaism and Christi-
anity.
BS600 Apocalyptic Literature (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to introduce the student
to that genre of literature found in early Judaism and
early Christianity which scholars call apocalyptic (Dan-
iel, Enoch, etc.) The main objective of this course is
investigation of the conceptual world of Jewish apoc-
alypticism and its formative value for early Christian
theology. It includes any influence of Jewish apoca-
lyptic thought and a major theological paradigm of
the Second Temple period on early Christian authors.
BS610 Biblical Characters and Leadership (3 credits)
This study surveys some of God’s greatest Biblical
characters, examining the strengths, weaknesses, vic-
tories and defeats of each. Discover proof of God’s
use of ordinary people to accomplish extraordinary
things. Through the depth of character within the
people of the Biblical stories, the student further
explores the topic of leadership from a biblical and
theological perspective. Essential biblical princi-
ples bearing on the purpose and character of lead-
ership will be examined. Instances of leadership in
the Old and New Testaments will be analyzed within
their biblical context, and in terms of contemporary
understanding of leadership, with a special focus on
the leadership of Jesus Christ as seen in the New
Testament. This course helps participants build a
theological, theoretical and practical foundation for
becoming effective leaders within an organization.
Motivational theory and its application to individual
and group productivity are explored. The course will
enable the student to evaluate and develop leader-
ship style and skills. This course is same as LDS520.
BSL601/602 Biblical Hebrew I, II (3 credits)
This is an intermediate course designed for stu-
dents who have completed the basic Biblical Hebrew
course. However, for the beginners this study goes
over the elements of Hebrew vocabulary, morpholo-
gy and grammar in review. Then it goes further work
in the areas of Hebrew grammar, syntax, vocabulary,
criticism, and the reading of the Hebrew Bible/Old
Testament. Prerequisite: FLH141 or equivalent course
BSL605/606 Biblical Greek I, II (3 credits)
This is an intermediate course designed for students
who have completed the basic Biblical Greek course.
However, for the beginners this study goes over the
elements of New Testament Greek vocabulary, mor-
phology and grammar in review. It goes further their
vocabulary, grammar, and syntaxical Koine Greek
skills, along with concentrated experience in reading
from the Greek New Testament. Selected readings
in biblical Greek designed to enable students to
read extended passages with facility. Prerequisite:
FLG151 or equivalent course
BSM701 Practicum (Ministry Project) (3 credits)
This course is an opportunity for on-the-job training.
Students should involve in various areas of ministry,
including the pulpit, education, church school min-

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istry, teaching, discipleship training, and campaign
evangelism with supervision by the faculty member
and the leader of the ministry field.
OLd TesTAmenT
OT500 Introduction to the Old Testament (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to the background
and content of the Old Testament. This introductory
course provides a chronological overview of the Old
Testament with an emphasis on theological interpre-
tation and application, covering the background, ma-
jor themes, and issues in the Pentateuch, historical
books, poetry, wisdom literature, and prophets. The
course introduces study of the Old Testament as the
Word of God, a work of literature, a work emerging
out of Israel’s history, and a work that needs to be
studied critically to grasp its significance.
OT502 Pentateuch (3 credits)
This course studies contents and theology of the
first five books of the Old Testament. Primary atten-
tion will be given to literary nature and structure and
theological message. Theories of origin and genetic
development will also be covered.
Prerequisite: OT500 and BS540
OT503 Historical Books (3 credits)
This course is a careful study of the major teachings
of the books of Joshua through Esther. The study in-
cludes the major characters and events with special
attention given to the nation of Israel from its origin
to its return from exile, and how Israel’s history relates
to God’s plan for the ages.
Prerequisite: OT500
OT504 Major Prophets (3 credits)
This course investigates the content and literary qual-
ities of the Major Prophets in light of their historical
background and their developing theological con-
tent. The study also includes interpretation and na-
ture of the prophetical books.
Prerequisite: OT500
OT505 Minor Prophets (3 credits)
This course examines the content and literary qual-
ities of the Minor Prophets in light of their historical
background and their developing theological con-
tent. The study also includes interpretation and na-
ture of the prophetical books.
Prerequisite: OT500
OT506 Wisdom Literature (3 credits)
This course is a survey of Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ec-
clesiastes and Song of Solomon. This material will be
explored in relation to its ancient Near East histori-
cal and cultural setting, and involves a study of the
nature of Hebrew poetry. The main themes of each
book will be evaluated in the theological light of the
New Testament. Prerequisite: OT500
OT550 Theology of the Old Testament (3 cred-
its)
This course is an introductory study to the various
approaches to the problematic nature of Old Testa-
ment theology. Emphasis is given to representative
theological themes and their historical development
in the Old Testament, employing methodology of the
contemporary biblical theology discipline.
Prerequisite: OT500
OT600 Old Testament Reading and Exegesis (3
credits)
This course is designed to exegete passages or por-

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tions from the books of the Old Testament by using
the tools of exegesis for proper translation, interpre-
tation and application of the texts. The study is fo-
cused on reading of the texts in the writings of the
Old Testament. Particular attention will be given to
the historical background, composition, structure,
particular themes, motifs, and meaning of the texts.
Prerequisites: OT500 and BSL601 or BS540
OT601 Genesis (3 credits)
This course examines the structure of the book of
Genesis, its theological message and the implica-
tions of its message today. The student will be led
through an analysis of this foundational book of the
Hebrew canon, including an intensive look at the first
four narratives. Prerequisites: OT500 and BS540
OT605 nehemiah and Ezra (3 credits)
This course examines the history of Israel under Per-
sian exile as described in the book of Nehemiah and
Ezra. Students consider the significance of return from
exile, the rebuilding of the Temple, the preservation
of the covenant people, the social and religious re-
forms of the post-exilic community, and biblical prin-
ciples of leadership. Prerequisites: OT500 and BS540
OT606 Psalms as Literature & Spirituality (3 cred-
its)
This course gives a special attention to examples of
the various types of Psalms which have made signif-
icant contributions to the Judeo-Christian tradition.
Psalms are particularly analyzed for their theological
meaning in relation to Christian preaching, teaching,
and other aspects of Christian life. Particular atten-
tion is given to formation of spirituality illuminated in
Psalms. Prerequisites: OT500 and BS540
OT610 Reading of Prophets: Jeremiah, Isaiah, etc. (3
credits)
This course will be an exposition, emphasizing the
background issues, purpose, structure, and interpre-
tation of prophetic literature and theological con-
tributions of Jeremiah or Isaiah or other prophetic
books.
Prerequisites: OT500 and BS540
neW TesTAmenT
nT500 Introduction to the new Testament (3 cred-
its)
An introductory course into the New Testament, this
study identifies the occasion, content, and structure
of the books of the New Testament with an emphasis
on theological interpretation and application as well
as the important events, individuals, and ideas which
constituted the environment in which the New Testa-
ment was written.
This course orients students to the literature of the
New Testament in its various literary, historical, and
theological contexts and to New Testament interpre-
tation in service of Christian practice.
nT502 Synoptic Gospels (3 credits)
This course is an exegetical examination of the Syn-
optic Gospels with concentration on exegetical
method in narrative materials, Synoptic comparisons,
identification of theology and interpretive problems
of each gospel. Prerequisites: NT500 and BS540
nT503 Gospel of John and Johannine Epistles (3
credits)
This course is designed to help students examine the
Fourth Gospel’s relationship, style and theology, to

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the Synoptic Gospels; and a portrait of Jesus as pre-
sented in the text. Particular attention will be given to
authorship, purpose and the writer’s doctrine of spir-
ituality. And also authorship, background, purpose,
intended readers, methodology and theology will
be the focus of this analysis of the Johannine letters.
Special attention will be given to the relationship of
the letters’ style and vocabulary to that of the Gospel,
the situation presupposed in the letters, particularly
2nd and 3rd John, the eschatology of the letters, and
their place within the context of the Johannine com-
munity. Prerequisites: NT500
nT504 Pauline Literature (3 credits)
This course is designed as a basic study of the back-
ground and message of the Pauline epistles. Particu-
lar attention will be paid to the application of specif-
ic truths within each book. Lecture, discussion, and
questioning will be included in the class sessions.
Homework will include the reading, analyzing, and
synthesizing of each book. Prerequisites: NT500
nT505 General Epistles (3 credits)
This study is an analytical survey of the interpretation
and meaning of Hebrews, James, I and II, Peter, I, II,
& III John, and Jude. Special emphasis will be given
to the historical circumstances, structure, interpreta-
tion, and distinctive themes and meanings of these
books. It further includes the exegesis of the text of
the Scripture, as well as appropriate application to
the life of the believer. Prerequisites: NT500
nT540 Jesus and the kingdom of God (3 credits)
This course is a study of the central message of Jesus.
His proclamation of the Kingdom of God is examined
together with his actualization of it in his ministry. His
Kingdom parables receive a special treatment, but
his attitude to the law and the Temple is also exam-
ined. The course is focused on the question of Jesus’
self-understanding and his aim expressed in his King-
dom preaching, and it climaxes with an exploration of
the relationship between Jesus’ Kingdom preaching
and the apostolic gospel.
Prerequisite: NT500
nT550 Theology of the new Testament (3 credits)
This course is a study of the theology of the New Tes-
tament in its own historical setting, categories, gen-
eral content, and thought forms and on its own terms
from the perspective and methodology of the con-
temporary biblical theology discipline. The course
describes what the New Testament’s major authors
(Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, and Paul) said about
God, Jesus Christ, the Holy Spirit, the Church, the last
times, etc. Prerequisite: NT500
nT560 use of Old Testament in the new Testament
(3 credits)
An investigation into the various ways in which the
New Testament writers employed the Scriptures of Is-
rael as witnesses to Jesus and to the church’s calling
to live faithfully as the people of God. Students will
assess NT writers’ use of scripture and explore pos-
sible ramifications for how contemporary Christians
should read the Old Testament.
Prerequisite: NT500
nT570 Christology in the new Testament (3 credits)
A topical study of theological perspectives on Jesus
attested in the earliest Christian texts, with some at-
tention to Jewish precedents and later Christian de-
velopments, covering questions such as: Why was Je-
sus identified by his followers as the Jewish messiah?
Where did the idea of an antichrist come from? How
did Jesus come to be thought of as God?
Pre-
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nT600 new Testament Reading and Exegesis (3
credits)
This is a study of basic principles and practice of ex-
egesis in the Greek New Testament and in a modern
language, with attention to methodological and bib-
liographical resources. It is designed to help the stu-
dent read and interpret the New Testament. Using
the tools of biblical exegesis and various criticisms,
in particular, students will examine the historical and
background issues, as well as theological approaches
in the texts. Particular attention will be given to theo-
logical implications and how they apply to contem-
porary issues of today’s church and daily lives.
Prerequisites: OT500 and BSL605 or BS540
nT601 Romans (3 credits)
This course will be an exposition, emphasizing the
background issues, purpose, structure, and interpre-
tation of prophetic literature and theological contri-
butions of Romans. In particular, it is a study of the
doctrinal, spiritual, and ethical values in Romans de-
signed to give the students an understanding of the
divine plan of salvation. Prerequisites: NT500 and
BS540
nT604 Luke and Acts of the Apostles (3 credits)
The book of Acts is the intended sequel to the gos-
pel of Luke, showing how the new community of
faith applied Christ’s teachings to life and how they
proclaimed His message throughout the world. This
course is a study of the Lukan narrative in the con-
tinuing story of the ministry of Jesus to the apostles
and the church. Close attention will focus on the
authorship, history, literary style and theological im-
plications of the texts. In this course, students com-
plete an exegetical study of both Luke and Acts by
focusing on the biblical theology of the book, the
historical background of events, and the theological
emphasis of the speeches and teachings. The goal
of the course is to enable learners to employ the
various critical methods utilized by scholars in their
study of the New Testament to study and exegete
this two-volume book and to articulate the message
of Luke-Acts. Prerequisites: NT500 and BS540
nT605 I and II Corinthians (3 credits)
This course will explore the historical background and
principal theological emphases of the two letters ad-
dressed to a first-century Gentile church. This study
seeks to discover the situation of the early Corinthian
church and to discern Paul’s pastoral and theological
responses in Corinthian correspondences.
Prerequisites: NT500 and BS540
nT606 Letter of James and Jude (3 credits)
This course explores a close reading of the letter of
James and Jude with special attention given to liter-
ary, socio-historical, and theological understandings
of the epistle. This study also examines the relation-
ships between faith and action in the life of Christian.
In particular, the students will investigate and com-
municate with theological disciplinary issue: “what
is the relationship between biblical exegesis, on the
one hand, and the disciplines of theology and ethics
on the other?”
Prerequisites: NT500 and BS540
nT610 Parables of Jesus (3 credits)
The main objective of this class is to introduce the
students to the principles for interpreting the para-
bles of Jesus as found in the Synoptic Gospels. At-
tention will be given to the history of interpretation
of the parables, the strengths and weaknesses of dif-
ferent hermeneutical principles used to interpret the
parables, and how to teach or preach from the para-
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nT620 Gospel as a Story: Mark, Matthew, Luke, and
John (3 credits)
This course offers an exegetical study of the Gos-
pels, emphasizing the background issues, purpose,
structure, and with careful attention given to social,
rhetorical, literary, and theological dimensions, impli-
cations, and contributions of the text in the Gospels.
This study will provide the student to explore each
Gospel writer’s parabolic presentation of the Jesus
story and to engage literary and sociological inter-
pretations while reading the text. Its primary purpose
of this course is to enable the student to begin devel-
oping an understanding the whole gospel as a story
of Jesus.
Prerequisites: NT500 and BS540
nT650 Miracle Stories (3 credits)
This course investigates the miracle stories of the
New Testament including its occasion, its category
and specific literary characters. The study examines
a variety of texts in biblical miracle stories inquiring
literary treatments of the theme. It also treats sig-
nificant differences from the others and formal sim-
ilarities. This investigation delves into the purpose
and meaning of these supernatural acts in the miracle
stories.
Prerequisite: NT500
nT655 Pauline Theology (3 credits)
This study focuses on Paul’s theology against his Jew-
ish and Hellenistic background and in the light of his
life and missionary situations. The course concen-
trates on a systematic exposition of Christology, so-
teriology, eschatology and other leading themes. yet
Paul’s relationship to Jesus-tradition and the pre-Pau-
line tradition, his use of Scripture, and his response to
the needs in his mission fields are also examined in
order to delineate the development of his theology
and to understand his method of theologizing. Pre-
requisite: NT500
nT660 Book of Revelation (3 credits)
In this course the student will study the nature of
apocalyptic literature in the New Testament era and
examine the structure and message of the Book of
Revelation against its historical background. Empha-
sis will be placed upon the significance of this book
for church in the world today. This study includes an
analysis of the book of Revelation in its historical con-
text, an exploration of the ways in which it has been
interpreted in church and culture throughout the cen-
turies (with special emphasis on contemporary fun-
damentalism), and a consideration of its message for
our own day. Prerequisite: NT500
nT665 Soteriology of St. Paul (3 credits)
This course investigates Pauls’ view and his theolo-
gy on the doctrine of salvation: the work of Christ in
bringing lost humanity into fellowship with God. The
study carefully analyzes in Paul’s teaching concerning
salvation in relation to the resurrection of Jesus Christ.
It also discusses how Paul develops and uses his the-
ology of resurrection in connection with the doctrines
of adoption, justification, sanctification, and glorifica-
tion in his writings.
Prerequisite: NT500
edUCATiOn And HisTOry &
PHenOmenOLOGy Of reLiGiOns
HPR500 Church History (3 credits)
This course is a study of the major movements with-
in the church and how they have influenced current
church practices, with a focus on the development of
theology. This survey of the major figures and events

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in church history from the church’s birth at Pentecost
to the present day covers materials from Church His-
tory to the Reformation.
HPR502 Church History II (3 credits)
This study is an introduction to the development of
Christianity from the Reformation to the modern pe-
riod. Emphasis is placed on central historical figures,
movements, and theological issues, with attention
given to their importance for Christian ministry today.
Major texts and interpretive studies are read.
Prerequisite: HPR500
RCE500 Fundamentals of Christian Education (3
credits)
This course provides a general overview of the pur-
poses, principles, and practices of Christian educa-
tion within the local church which includes historical,
theological, and philosophical aspects, underlying
dynamics of the teaching-learning process. In this
study, the student will examine the foundation of
Christian teaching, patterns and processes of Chris-
tian teaching, crucial roles in and varieties within
Christian teaching.
RCE510 Philosophy of Christian Education (3 cred-
its)
This study provides both the history and develop-
ment of a variety of educational philosophies within
Christian Education. The content includes an exam-
ination of fundamental theological issues underlying
education, including the relationship of revelation to
other disciplines, the Christian conception of persons
and knowing, and the relationship of the Church to
culture. Emphasis is on a comparison of philosophical
ideas in education and on the development of a per-
sonal philosophy of education.
RCE520 Church’s Educational Ministry (3 credits)
This course covers the organization, development,
and maintenance of educational ministries for chil-
dren, youth and adults within the context of the local
church and its outreach. The establishment and op-
eration of Christian day schools and camps will also
be dealt with. This course is foundational to more
specialized ministry courses to be taken in various
programs of study. It also teaches how to discover,
recruit, and train teachers. Curriculum design is pre-
sented, support services are explored and methods
of publicity are considered.
RCE550 The Bible and Christian Education (3 cred-
its)
This course is a survey of the biblical foundations of a
dynamic and effective personal philosophy of Chris-
tian education. It includes a study of the history of
religious education from Old Testament times to the
present, various theories of religious education, and
of related philosophical, psychological, theological,
and denominational issues. The focus will be on
gaining a Biblical perspective about God’s purpose
for the Church and about how He designed it to func-
tion, with a view to helping students become strong
contributors to their church bodies.
RCE570 Christian Education in Multi-Cultural Con-
text (3 credits)
This course is designed to help Christian educators
understand their own culture of teaching and learn-
ing, to equip them to become effective learners and
teachers in other cultural contexts, and to help them
reflect on cultural differences and conflicts using the
perspective of the Bible and faith in Jesus Christ.

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RCE580 Christian Education and Psychology (3
credits)
This course provides a comprehensive study of the
psychology of Christian education. It is designed to
introduce Christian psychological principles, theories,
and methodologies to issues of teaching and learn-
ing in schools and different settings. The study also
includes an examination of the social role of educa-
tion in postindustrial societies. Christian perspectives
on education, learning, and schools are emphasized.
RCE600 Human Development and Educational Min-
istry (3 credits)
This course explores the application of human devel-
opment, other social science theory, and research to
Christian Education. Spiritual development through
the lifespan is highlighted, as well as the importance
of understanding social context and organizational
dynamics for effective ministry.
RCE610 Teaching/Learning Methods (3 credits)
This course provides graduate students with an un-
derstanding of the teaching/learning process. It is
designed to explore the philosophy of education with
pedagogy for the task of teaching the Bible in an-
other culture. The course will be useful for students
who desire to teach the Bible in any cultural setting as
well as a local church setting. Students will consider
paradigm shifts in the roles of teacher, learner, and
technology. Students will compare and contrast the
effectiveness of various technology types and how
they impact the teaching/learning process. Students
will develop technology enhanced learning experi-
ences while developing technology skills reflective of
the best practices and applications.
inTerCULTUrAL sTUdies
ICS510 Intercultural Communication in Multi-Ethnic
Context (3 credits)
This course presents foundational principles of inter-
cultural communication from the fields of social psy-
chology, cultural anthropology, and communication
theory integrated with selected areas of personal
encounter in cross-cultural settings. This study intro-
duces students to the mosaic of languages, cultural
traditions, and values in today’s diverse world. Partic-
ipants explore cultural issues and resources for minis-
try, especially in a Multi-Ethnic context.
ICS520 Evangelism, Church Growth, and Contextu-
alization (3 credits)
This is a study of the planting, nurturing, and develop-
ing of new churches in contemporary culture with an
evaluation of the modern church growth movement.
ICS530 Intercultural Ministry and Strategy (3 cred-
its)
This course introduces students to contemporary
types of cross-cultural ministry and solutions to fund-
raising, networking, and partnerships. It also explores
entry approaches, learning methods, and processes
for developing strategies for successful intercultural
mission work.
ICS550 Christian Mission and Cultural Anthropology
(3 credits)
This course is an overview of the principles of cultural
anthropology. The study includes both the cross-cul-
tural analysis of such topics as religion, language,
family, economics, and political systems, along with
an introduction to culture and personality studies,
structural functional analysis, and cultural ecology.

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Prerequisite: ICS510
ICS580 Cross-Cultural Church Planting and Church
Growth (3 credits)
In order to truly fulfill the Great Commission, new
churches must be planted in every group of people
throughout the world. In order to plant churches in
these diverse cultural settings, we must understand
multiple issues that are unique to cross-cultural set-
tings and then use the appropriate strategies that will
cause those churches to grow, flourish, and repro-
duce. This course focuses on how and why we must
plant in cultures churches that are self-governing,
self-supporting, self-propagating, and indigenous.
Prerequisite: ICS520
ICS600 Postmodern Issues for Mission (3 credits)
This course is an in-depth examination of the effects
of cultural change in five key areas that directly af-
fect Christian mission and theology, including postin-
dustrial technology, post-literate communication,
postmodern philosophies, post-colonial politics, and
post-orthodox spiritualties.
Prerequisite: MIS515
MIS500 Perspectives in Mission (3 credits)
This class will lead students in an understanding of
world missions, as defined and mandated in the Bi-
ble; the history and expansion of the World Christian
Movement; the understanding of cross-cultural mis-
sions and mission’s terminology; and the strategy in
mission’s development.
MIS505 History of korean Mission Movement (3
credits)
This course presents a survey of Korean church histo-
ry, focusing on mission movement, in coming mission
to Korea, as well as outgoing missions to other parts
of world. The course will review the problems of mis-
sion in Korea as well as other Korean missionary ac-
tivities, including the diaspora of mission movement.
MIS510 Fundamentals in Evangelism and Contextu-
alization (3 credits)
This course is designed to equip students for evan-
gelism by emphasizing the biblical basis for outreach.
The study provides an overview of the Gospel, the
Great Commission, and the Great Commandment.
Principles and practices of evangelism will be includ-
ed as well as opportunities for practical experience.
Emphasis is given to surveying tools needed for the
task of world evangelism with special focus on per-
sonal preparation for one-to-one evangelism within a
variety of contexts.
MIS515 Biblical Theology of Mission (3 credits)
This course is the study of the theological foundations
of mission. It examines both the Old and New Testa-
ments, including Israel’s responsibility to the nations,
the mandates of Jesus Christ, and Pauline missiology.
The course also considers the contemporary issues of
ecumenism, syncretism, and universalism, as well as
the emerging theologies of indigenous churches in
diverse cultures.
MIS520 History of Global Christian Mission (3 cred-
its)
This course is an overview of the history of Christian
missions. The course seeks to explore the history of
Christianity from both an ecumenical and missiolog-
ical perspective. Consideration is given to methods,
principles, and practices involved in the advance-
ment of Christian missions at various points in the
history of the church. Theological, multi-cultural,
and contextual perspectives are presented within
an overall historical framework selectively chosen to

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represent key themes in the expansion of Christianity.
The course provides a truly global perspective on the
World Christian Movement by emphasizing the his-
tory of Christianity in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and
Oceania. The course also explores alternate histories
of Christianity that are not told from the standpoint of
the ‘victors.’
MIS530 Christianity and Worldviews (3 credits)
An introduction to the history, development and
function of the Christian Worldview which includes an
examination of the philosophical, theological foun-
dations and applications of a Christian view of reality,
knowledge, ethics, aesthetics. This course compares
and contrasts the Christian Worldview with those of
naturalism, humanism, and transcendentalism, post-
modernism, and other religions and diverse cultures.
MIS600 urban Mission Development (3 credits)
This course presents a study of the nature and meth-
ods of Christian mission as they apply to the devel-
opment and implementation of a mission strategy for
the urban area in the trend of civilization as well as
the training of individuals for outreach in the urban
community.
MIS605 Indigenous Principle in Missions (3 credits)
This course constitutes a comprehensive survey of the
theological and sociological factors that promote the
growth, maturity, and reproduction of local congre-
gations and indigenous movements. Special empha-
sis is placed on intercultural ministry and emerging
churches. Approaches to church growth theory and
practice, developmental models, local leadership,
church-mission relations, and contextualization are
examined and evaluated.
Prerequisites: ICS510 or MIS500
ISM650 Independent Study (3 credits)
This study provides a way for well-motivated students
to pursue a topic of interest that does not necessar-
ily fit into a traditional academic setting for learning.
It is a way for students to learn specialized materi-
al or gain research experience and skills in relation
to the specific subject under the supervision of aca-
demic expertise. The main purpose is to provide stu-
dents opportunities to explore their interests deeper
scholastically and academically. Often students with
high scholastic standing are encouraged to take this
course to try to learn without regular attendance in
a class, rather with research and self study. It is also
useful for self-directed learning activities that allow
the student to be self-reliant in the specific subject
areas.
ISM701/702 Practicum I, II (Mission Project I, II) (6
credits)
This course offers the opportunity to experience and
practice a mission field in culturally diverse settings.
This practicum is designed to be a mission-training
field through such experience. After participating in
a mission project, students are required to submit a
report, including self-evaluation and assessment for
future mission work.
LAW, BUsiness mAnAGemenT,
And LeAdersHiP
LDS500 Leadership and Inter-Relationship (3 credits)
This course presents an introduction to skills utilized
in developing helping relationships. Special empha-
sis is placed upon the person-to-person, day-to-day
relationships. This course provides students with an
overview of family systems theory as a basis for un-

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derstanding core interpersonal dynamics. The class
will be conducted through both a cognitive and ex-
periential approach.
LDS505 Effective Leadership and Dynamics (3 cred-
its)
The students will analyze issues of the soul (mind,
emotions and will). This analysis will be accomplished
by examining their emotions, their perceptions, their
beliefs, the scriptures, and scientific studies. Addi-
tionally, the students will study how a healthy lead-
er’s thoughts and actions are manifested in practical
principles.
LDS510 Leadership Development for Ministry (3
credits)
This course provides direct leadership experience
to promote reflection and evaluation of one’s own
leadership abilities with the goal of developing those
qualities for future application. Biblical principles of
leading others in a ministry context will be integrated
with thinking and practice.
LDS520 Biblical Leadership and Characters (3 cred-
its)
This study surveys some of God’s greatest Biblical
characters, examining the strengths, weaknesses, vic-
tories and defeats of each. Discover proof of God’s
use of ordinary people to accomplish extraordinary
things. Through the depth of character within the
people of the Biblical stories, the student further
explores the topic of leadership from a biblical and
theological perspective. Essential biblical princi-
ples bearing on the purpose and character of lead-
ership will be examined. Instances of leadership in
the Old and New Testaments will be analyzed within
their biblical context, and in terms of contemporary
understanding of leadership, with a special focus on
the leadership of Jesus Christ as seen in the New
Testament. This course helps participants build a
theological, theoretical and practical foundation for
becoming effective leaders within an organization.
Motivational theory and its application to individual
and group productivity are explored. The course will
enable the student to evaluate and develop leader-
ship style and skills. This course is same as BS610.
LDS550 Diversity and Cultural Leadership (3 credits)
This course is designed to examine and bring to con-
sciousness the social, cultural, and historical influenc-
es on leadership in a multicultural democracy. This
will be done by investigating and making visible as-
pects of the social forces, cultural dynamics, and his-
torical contexts, which influence human experience.
Discoveries to leadership roles and practices will also
be applied and used to question the ends or purpos-
es of our leadership practices. The course involves
both theory and practice with an emphasis on practi-
tioner research.
LDS600 Time Management and Ministry (3 credits)
This course is based on the fact that those who would
be ministry leaders within the church of Jesus Christ
are called upon to be examples of the believers in
all aspects of life. This course is designed to pro-
vide leaders with spiritual as well as practical tools
to assist with effectively managing an organization
or ministry. This course is intended to help students
explore God’s expectations for leaders in relation to
personal discipline, integrity, relationships, and fi-
nancial prudence. Special emphasis is laid on time
management for an effective ministry and self-disci-
pline and self-control for a faithful ministry leader with
servant-ship. Students will be given opportunity to
evaluate themselves and to develop a plan for per-
sonal character development and time management

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in ministry.
LDS610 Pastoral Coaching (3 credits)
Ministry leaders face difficult stressors and often have
few resources with whom to share their struggles.
This study provides that safe, listening ear and trained
supportive person to determine the next best steps
on their journey. It examines the methodology of the
pastoral ministry including practical pastoral roles
and disciplines. The main purpose of this course is to
offer support, structure, accountability and possible
assessment tools to further pastoral ministry agen-
da. This learning process will lead the students to
have their best interests at heart rather than having
an agenda of their own. The study will help them to
explain how to achieve what they want and how to set
benchmarks for performance along the way, and help
them strategize but not run the race for themselves in
serving pastoral ministry.
PrACTiCAL THeOLOGy And
minisTry
PCC500 Introduction to Pastoral Care and Listening
(3 credits)
This is an introductory course where special attention
is given to psychological and theological aspects of
basic human needs of having a deep yearning to be
understood as well as perspectives on pastoral care
with empathic listening. The course invites students
to the practice of actual visitation with people with
different levels of distress including grief, loss, anger,
fear, anxiety, guilt, shame, and other forms of human
suffering. While this course integrates theoretical as-
pects of listening, practice of pastoral care, verbatim
writing, presentation, peer evaluation as well as group
dynamics, the course is designed to help participants
to grow in the area of self-awareness, along with his/
her capacity to contribute to caring ministries and re-
lationships in general. The primary goal of the course
is to help pastors or pastoral care givers who want to
grow in the area of listening; however, the course can
also be useful for lay people who want to establish
better relationship with their family members, friends
and neighbors with increased capacity to listen.
PCC540 Introduction to Marriage and Family Coun-
seling (3 credits)
This course focuses on the characteristics of problem
areas and their solutions in courtship and marriage.
It covers the social and economic problems of the
American family, the relations of parents with chil-
dren, and the relations between home and church.
The course uses a case study approach.
PCC600 Pastoral Counseling with Couples and Fam-
ilies (3 credits)
This course introduces students to a range of theo-
logical and theoretical resources and approaches
related to marriage and family care and counseling.
Students are encouraged to give attention to the
areas of pre-marital counseling and marriage enrich-
ment and navigate their own marriage and family
experiences. Furthermore, students will learn how
careful navigation of these experiences can impact
the overall health and stability of family life. Through
this process, students will start to develop strategies
for the care of marriages and families throughout the
lifecycle and integrate their theological and biblical
perspectives on family with psychological perspec-
tives such as family systems theory.
PCC700 Clinical Pastoral Education, unit I (3 credits)
This course is a supervised clinical training related

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to ministry in human crises. Students serve as chap-
lains at hospitals and other institutions, while learning
through didactic seminars, self-awareness groups,
case conferences, and individual supervision. This is
ten-week courses during the summer, fourteen-week
courses during semesters, and in extended units from
October to April. (3 semester hours; offered Pass/Fail
Credit)
Prerequisites: acceptance into a basic unit of CPE in a
program accredited by the Associate of Clinical Pas-
toral Education, and departmental approval
PT501 Life Journey in Faith (3 credits)
This course presents spiritual formation as an inten-
tional emphasis of the Church, whereby we seek to
facilitate and cooperate with the work of the Spirit of
God - primarily through cultivating climate of disci-
pleship, encouraging spiritual practices that make us
more open and responsive to the Spirit’s activity, and
developing resources that address the varying needs
of persons at different places in their faith pilgrimage.
This course provides for the self-evaluation of per-
sonal faith and character in addition to opportunities
for expressing a greater commitment to life in Christ.
A challenging wilderness expedition or camp expe-
rience is combined with reading assignments, Scrip-
ture studies, and group discussions.
PT520 Introduction to Preaching and Communica-
tion (3 credits)
This course is an introductory study of preaching and
communication including various methods of sermon
development which expounds a biblical text in an ac-
curate and effective manner. It is designed to equip
the student in the preparation of the development
and delivery of sermons. To develop proficiency as a
preacher, the student will learn the process of moving
from analysis of the text through exegesis to a sermon
structure which communicates truth to contemporary
minds. The ability to communicate effectively is im-
portant in all areas of life. One of the goals of this
course is the development of basic oral communica-
tion skills to give the student confidence in extempo-
raneous speaking giving their testimony, presenting a
devotional message, delivering a sermon, etc.
PT525 narrative Preaching (3 credits)
This course is an analysis of the structures and meth-
ods used to prepare biblical, “Big Idea,” narrative
messages from the Gospels. It includes a study of
the unique features of biblical narrative as well as the
exegetical, hermeneutical, and theological principles
learned in New Testament Exposition and interpreta-
tion. Special emphasis is on the method of narrative
preaching and its delivery. This study includes various
practices and workshop in order that the students can
develop their preaching style as a narrative preacher.
PT530 Christian Worship and Sacraments (3 credits)
This study is an examination of worship in the Bible,
both Old and New Testaments, with a view to devel-
oping a theology of worship that is consistent with
the teachings of Scripture. Special attention will be
paid to the appropriate application of this theology
for the church today. Students will explore the con-
cept of worship in Scripture. The class will explore
various contexts in which worship takes place: private
worship, corporate worship, and the role of music in
worship. The study also includes an in-depth study of
the theology of Christian sacraments and the symbol-
ization of divine grace.
PT535 Church Administration (3 credits)
One of the purposes in this study is to acquire and
improve administration skills for utilization in the local
church. This course provides the students to improve

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management skills and to increase the productivity
with their organization, church, committee, depart-
ment, or ministry within the Body of Christ. The stu-
dents will examine the principle role of the church
administrator. Special attention will be paid on the
issues of ministry leadership, including organization-
al theory, ethics, conflict management, and personal
concerns for integrity and spiritual health. The study
also includes an introduction to the privileges and re-
sponsibilities of pastoral ministry outside of teaching
and preaching. This will include hiring staff, working
with volunteers, etc.
PT540 Church Polity (3 credits)
Each student should take this course as a process for
an ordination. The student must learn church polity,
the nature and importance of the ordinances and reg-
ulations of his/her denomination that he/she belongs
to. This course is designed to help students under-
stand denominational life and polity as it relates to
local congregational ministry. We will also look at
some of the practical “nuts and bolts” of how to lead
and manage complex church organizations. This will
include understanding the traits of a healthy congre-
gation, the influence of size, age, and makeup on the
life of the congregation, congregational lifecycles
and redevelopment, ways to help your church grow,
and other organizational and administrative issues
that are important for Christian leaders to understand
today.
PT545 Liturgy and Dynamics in Worship (3 credits)
This study is an introduction to the phenomenon and
power of ritual and symbolic activity with particular
emphasis on how these provide a foundation for un-
derstanding Christian rituals and sacraments includ-
ing a study of Christian worship examining the his-
torical development of worship in its interaction with
various cultures from ancient to modern. This course
is an investigation and evaluation of the contempo-
rary ministry of worship in Christian churches from
the biblical, historical, and pastoral perspectives. It
seeks to equip and stimulate the Christian minister
to creatively develop sound, authentic, and dynamic
worship resulting in spiritual renewal to God’s people
today. It includes designing liturgy for all celebrative,
commemorative life events such as weddings, birth-
days, dedication, baptism, Lord’s Supper, anniversa-
ries, funerals, and others. Course objectives are to
understand the dynamics of worship and to engage
in critical reflection on the experience of liturgical
leadership. This course examines the role of liturgy in
the lives of Christians and their communities, explor-
ing the tensions between liturgical norms and liturgy
as practiced and experienced.
PT550 Women in Ministry (3 credits)
Consideration is given to both the impact of the
Church on women and the impact of women on the
Church from biblical times to the present. The course
is interdisciplinary in its structure, investigating the
topic of women in ministry from biblical, historical,
theological, psychological, sociological, anthropo-
logical, and pastoral perspectives.
PT560 Developing Children’s Ministry (3 credits)
This course examines how to involve preschool and
elementary children in ministry in the local church, the
community, and missions. Attention will be given to
how children learn to serve and how teachers can rec-
ognize and cultivate the God-given talents of each of
their students. How to motivate children and how to
avoid obstacles that discourage their involvement will
also be discussed. Also included are resources that
encourage children to be active in ministry at their
age-level. Emphasis is on a specialized method of

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developing and evaluating children’s ministries and
resources as it pertains to specific programs, such as
Bible clubs, Kids’ crusades, children’s church, music,
drama, and other children’s activities.
PT580 Introduction to Church Planting (3 credits)
How do you start a new church? What is a church?
What is a healthy church? What is a church planter?
What are the stages of a church plant? This course
will investigate the biblical and theological basis for
church plants, as well as the practical aspects of start-
ing a new work. This course is designed for students
who are interested in church planting or have a call
to plant a church. It is also ideal for those who have
recently started a church plant.
PT600 Worship and Culture (3 credits)
This class will explore the relationship of cultures,
their values, symbols, and rituals to Christian wor-
ship. It will explore national and ethnic cultures, as
well as generational, class, artistic, and technological
cultures. The course will also focus on gaining an un-
derstanding leading to an application of theories of
culture and worship.
SM701/SM702 Supervised Ministry Practicum I, II (6
credits)
Supervised Ministry Practicum is a practical training
course that combines real hands-on ministry experi-
ence under the mentorship of a ministry professional.
This course is done through a non-traditional format
in that it is measured based on the supervised time
spent under a ministry mentor’s direction. Upon
completion students are required to submit a Practi-
cum Resume detailing the ministries performed in
meeting the requirements of the Practicum. The
student must have their Practicum Resume read and
signed by their practicum ministry supervisor, before
it is turned in to their advisor. The course requires
a pastor-mentor relationship with someone who has
had at least five years experience in the area of min-
istry the student is pursuing. The student will also
establish a Congregational Support Team comprised
of three lay leaders in his/her local church. The Pas-
tor/Mentor and Hudson Taylor Faculty Members will
serve as consultants and evaluators throughout the
Supervised Ministry Experience.
TS701/702 Practicum I, II (Ministry Project I, II) (3
credits each)
This course offers the opportunity to experience and
practice a ministry field in culturally diverse settings.
This practicum is designed to be a ministry-training
field through such experience. After participating in
a ministry project, students are required to submit a
report, including self-evaluation and assessment for
future ministry work.
reseArCH And WriTinG
MA700 Thesis/Project (Optional) (3 credits)
This option is offered to those students who want to
write a thesis or a research paper, working out the
implications and possibilities of professional ministry
for mission and life-enrichment, instead of taking a
course.

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sOCieTy And PersOnALiTy
sCienCes
RS510 Society and Religion (3 credits)
Mission study is not possible without learning the re-
lations between society and religion because human
life is always related to two structures. This course
will study the influence between society and religion
and how the gospel could impact these structures of
human life.
RS530 Jesus and Contemporary Society (3 credits)
This course is designed to analyze the topics of mor-
al issues in our society in the context of the morality
that is outlined in the Bible. We will compare ethical
perspective of the 1st century and the contempo-
rary world with a holistic approach, examining Jesus’
moral spirit on historical and ethical traditions in the
context of mixed cultural and social diversity of the
postmodern era. Through this course, students will
recognize Jesus’ spirit of deconstruction of non-pro-
ductive, hypocritical, external tradition of Jewish so-
ciety in the1st century. This class guides you to Jesus’
idealistic, transcendental, eschatological world in or-
der to establish the Kingdom of God.
RS535 Christ and Culture (3 credits)
This course is a historical and contemporary survey
of various models for understanding the relationship
between the church and culture. Special focus will be
given to modern controversial issues with an attempt
to critique them from a Christian perspective. Stu-
dents will understand the challenges of dealing with
the new and different and develop skills in order to
make cultural adjustments necessary for ministering
within the context of another culture.
RS550 Psychology of Religion (3 credits)
This course is an introductory study of the psycholog-
ical phenomena of religion in individuals and groups.
Attention is given to psychological sources of religion,
problems of faith and doubt, worship, mysticism, ed-
ucation, and other basic aspects of religious life.
RS605 Philosophy of the Christian Religion (3 cred-
its)
A philosophical study of essential Christian concepts
and beliefs aimed at assessing their rational coher-
ence and explanatory power. Explores and evaluates
various Christian positions on key topics while also
engaging important religious and secular positions.
Topics include: the relation of faith and reason, the
divine attributes, arguments for the existence of God,
the problem of evil, providence and free will, mira-
cles, religious language, the relation of science and
religion, etc.
Prerequisite: RS510
sysTemATiC And PHiLOsOPHiCAL
THeOLOGy
SPT520 Philosophy and Theology (3 credits)
This course is an introductory study in comparison
of Christian perspective and philosophical thought.
The study focuses on the different perspective and
thoughts in order to develop one’s own Christian per-
spective on life value and the world. The purpose of
this course is to develop Christian aspect with philo-
sophical thinking in a deeper way.
SPT550 Systematic Theology I (3 credits)
This course gives a general introduction to the nature,
history, and methodology of systematic theology, as
well as insight into the relationship of systematic the-

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ology to other disciplines. This course explores the
biblical foundations of the Christian doctrines.
SPT 552 Systematic Theology II (3 credits)
This study examines the doctrine of divine election,
the covenant of grace, the person and work of Christ
the Mediator. The doctrines of divine calling, regen-
eration, repentance, faith, justification, adoption and
sanctification are further explored.
Prerequisite: SPT550
SPT 553 Systematic Theology III: Ecclesiology and
Eschatology (3 credits)
This course studies the doctrine of the church, its na-
ture and authority, and the worship of the church, the
sacraments and prayer. The doctrine of last things,
death and resurrection, the final judgment, heaven
and hell will be discussed.
Prerequisite: SPT550
SPT555 Christian Ethics (3 Credits)
This course challenges the believer to integrate an
understanding of Scripture, movements in church his-
tory, and ethical principles into one’s personal Chris-
tian life, work, and ministry. Emphasis is placed on
biblical perspectives to contemporary ethical issues
facing the church and the minister. These issues in-
clude divorce, abortion, euthanasia, genetic control,
sex, war, racism, ecology, personal lifestyle, and the
church’s responsibility.
SPT560 Topics in Philosophy of Religion (3 credits)
An examination of three major areas in philosophy of
religion: (1) faith and reason (including epistemology,
the justification of religious belief, theological meth-
od); (2) the relation between Christianity and science
(including historical issues, evolution and creation,
the apologetic value of science); and (3) the nature of
the human person (dualist and physicalist accounts,
religious experience, life after death).
SPT580 Christian Doctrine (3 credits)
An advanced course that bases the theological for-
mation of students upon biblical data as well as upon
the classical Christian tradition, contemporary theol-
ogy, and Calvin and Wesleyan theological distinctive-
ness with a view to helping students grasp the impor-
tance of theology for the practice of ministry.
Prerequisite: SPT550
SPT 582 Christian Apologetics (3 credits)
An introductory study of apologetics. It seeks to show
the reasonableness of Christian theism, giving an-
swers to the objections raised by secularism, atheism,
scientific naturalism, and other religions. The biblical
foundation of apologetics, Christian epistemology
and ontology, classical methodologies and contem-
porary methodologies, the insufficiency of compet-
ing worldviews are presented.
SPT585 Theology of Martin Luther (3 credits)
This study is a critical analysis of the theology of Mar-
tin Luther, with attention to his essential writings in
the areas of the task of theology, the Word of God
and Scripture, the Righteousness of God and salva-
tion, the church, the sacraments, the two kingdoms
and the Christian life.
Prerequisite: SPT550
SPT590 The Theology of Augustine (3 credits)
This study is an examination and analysis of the major
theological ideas of Augustine as seen in his major
writings.
Prerequisite: SPT550 or HPR500

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SPT610 Perspectives on Social Ethics (3 credits)
This course is an exploration of the sociopolitical im-
plications of biblical faith, with reference to such top-
ics as political authority, the task of the state, and the
ground of Christian political involvement. Differing
Christian perspectives will be examined.
SPT620 The Doctrine of the Holy Spirit (3 credits)
This study deals with biblical, historical, and experien-
tial aspects of the Holy Spirit. Special attention is giv-
en to spiritual gifts, current renewal movements, and
the relationship of the Holy Spirit with contemporary
signs and wonders. In consultation with the professor,
each student researches a biblical, historical, or theo-
logical theme related to the Holy Spirit.
Prerequisite: SPT550

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UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL
BOArd Of direCTOrs
Chairperson
Linda Park
B.A. Adelphi University
seCretary
Charles Wrinkle, Esq., J.D.
Attorney-At-Law specializing in Criminal Defense, Gwinnett County, GA
MeMbers
Richard S. Yoon, Esq., J.D.
Ex Officio Member as President of Hudson Taylor University
Rev. David Shim, D.Min
D. Min., Faith Theological Seminary
M. Div., Chongshin University
B.A., Grace Bible College
Jesse J. Sligh, Esq., J.D.
Executive Assistant District Attorney, Queens County, New york
AdminisTrATive PersOnneL
president
Richard S. Yoon, Esq., J.D.
J.D., St. John’s University School of Law
B.A., Columbia College, Columbia University
direCtor of aCadeMiC affairs
Rev. Byong kie Choi, Ph.D.
Ph. D., Drew University
Th. M., Princeton Theological Seminary
M. Div., McCormick Theological Seminary
B.S., So Gang University
un
IVERSITY PERSO
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faCulty CoMMittee Chair
Rev. Suk Min Jang, STM
STM, Chicago Theological Seminary
Th. M, Harvard University
M. Div., Emory University
BA, Northeastern Bible College
Chaplain
Rev. Jung Dae Lee, M Div.
M Div., Midwest University
B. Th., youngnam Theological University and Seminary
direCtor of adMissions
Rev. Hee Duck Yoo, PhD.
Ph. D., Mid-America Baptist Theological Seminary
Th. M., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary
M. Div., Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary
B. Th., Teajon Baptist Theological Seminary
direCtor of adMinistration
F. Phillip Rustamov, M.E.T.
M.E.T., Boise State University
B.P.S., University of World Economy and Diplomacy
direCtor of student affairs
Rev. Yong Soo Jo, Ph. D.
Ph. D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary
M. Div., Korea Baptist Theological University/Seminary
B.S., Busan National University
direCtor of finanCial affairs (interiM)
Richard S. Yoon, Esq., J.D.
J.D., St. John’s University School of Law
B.A., Columbia College, Columbia University
registrar
Rita Wong
international student affairs
Rita Wong
direCtor of library
Debra Giannone, M.L.S
MLS, Long Island University, C.W. Post Campus
BAGM, Concordia College
un
IVERSITY PERSO
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fULL Time fACULTy
departMent of bibliCal studies and theology
Rev. Byong kie Choi, Ph. D.
Head of Department
Ph. D., Drew University
Th. M., Princeton Theological Seminary
M. Div., McCormick Theological Seminary
B.S., So Gang University
Rev. Suk Min Jang, STM
STM, Chicago Theological Seminary
Th. M, Harvard University
M. Div., Emory University
BA, Northeastern Bible College
Rev. Yong Soo Jo, Ph. D.
Ph. D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary
M. Div., Korea Baptist Theological University/Seminary
B.S., Busan National University
Chaplain
Rev. Jung Dae Lee, M Div.
M. Div., Midwest University
B.Th., youngnam Theological University and Seminary
liturgiCal studies and preaChing
Rev. Hee Duck Yoo, Ph. D.
Ph. D., Mid-America Baptist Theological Seminary
Th. M., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary
M. Div., Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary
B. Th., Teajon Baptist Theological Seminary
fine arts
Prof. Sooyeon kim, M.A.
M. A., Iowa State University
B.F.A., Seoul National University of Technology
FAC
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CoMputer sCienCe and eduCational leadership
Prof. Ayo Brewer, M. Div.
M. Div., Oral Roberts University
M.S., South Bank University
B.S., North London University
inforMation teChnology and soCial Media
Prof. F. Phillip Rustamov, M.E.T.
M.E.T., Boise State University
B.P.S., University of World Economy and Diplomacy
PArT Time fACULTy
Rev. Chaneung Jung, Ph. D. (Evangelism and Inter-Cultural Studies)
Ph. D., Asbury Theological Seminary
M. Div., Asbury Theological Seminary
M.A., Korean Methodist Theological Seminary
B.A., Korean Methodist Theological Seminary
Dr. Soo H. kim, Ph.D. (Education and Curriculum)
Ph. D., University of Minnesota
M.A., University of Minnesota
M. Ed., Sook Myung Women’s University
B.S., yonsei University
Rev. Hun-Woo Yoo, Ph. D. (Computer Graphics & Image)
Ph. D., Korea University
M. Div., Talbot School of Theology, Biola University
M.S., Inha University
B.S., Inha University
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Matthew Grantham Chipman, M.A. (ESL & English)
M.A., University of vermont
B.A., University of Georgia
Dr. Soo Jin kim, DMA.
D.M.A., University of Georgia
M.M., University of Georgia
M.M., Georgia State University
Tuan n. nguyen, M.B.A. (Economics)
M.B.A., Mercer University
B.B.A., Mercer University
FAC
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referenCe infOrmATiOn
ACAdemiC CALendAr 2016-2017
The dates represent activities planned, and are tentative dates, therefore. may change.
The most current academic calendar will be made available on university homepage,
www.HudsonTayloruniversity.org
Course sequences can be found in the Kanopy SIS Student Portal.
August
15
17-20
9
11
11-16
18
15
14-19
4-9
25
7
9-13
31
27
4
11-16
21-26
28-12/3
5-9
5
10
17-22
New Students Orientation
Fall Semester Begins
Periods for Course Change & Cancellation
New Students Orientation
Spring Semester Begins
Periods for Course change & cancellation
Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday
President’s Day
Spring Semester Mid-Term
Spring Break
Final Exam, Holy Communion Service,
Graduation Committee Meeting
1st Commencement Ceremony
Registration for Summer Session
Summer Session Begins
Summer Session Ends
Independence Day
Registration for Fall Semester
Thanksgiving Day Break (No Class)
Final Exam
Late Registration for Spring Semester
2016
Labor Day
Columbus Day
Fall Semester Mid-Term Period
January
February
March
April
May
May
June
July
September
October
november
December
sPrinG 2016 semesTer
fALL 2016 semesTer
sUmmer 2016 sessiOn
ACADEMIC CALE
n
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August
19
21
21-26
7
9
9-14
16
6
8
8-13
15
20
19
13-18
12-17
4-9
24-29
23-28
6
8-12
5
7-11
30
26
4
17-22
20-25
27-12/2
4-9
6
9
16-21
New Students Orientation
Fall Semester Begins
Periods for Course Change & Cancellation
New Students Orientation
Spring Semester Begins
Periods for Course change & cancellation
Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday
New Students Orientation
Spring Semester Begins
Periods for Course change & cancellation
Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday
President’s Day
President’s Day
Spring Semester Mid-Term
Spring Semester Mid-Term
Spring Break
Final Exam, Holy Communion Service,
Graduation Committee Meeting
Final Exam, Holy Communion Service,
Graduation Committee Meeting
2nd Commencement Ceremony
Registration for Summer Session
3rd Commencement Ceremony
Registration for Summer Session
Summer Session Begins
Summer Session Ends
Independence Day
Registration for Fall Semester
Thanksgiving Day Break (No Class)
Registration Periods for Spring 2018
Final Exam
Labor Day
Columbus Day
Fall Semester Mid-Term Period
January
January
February
February
March
March
April
April
May
May
May
June
July
September
October
november
December
sPrinG 2017 semesTer
sPrinG 2018 semesTer
fALL 2017 semesTer
sUmmer 2017 sessiOn
ACADEMIC CALE
n
DAR

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index
In
DE
x
Academic information
39
Admission
General Admission Policies
19
Transfer Students
21
Calendar
118
Courses
Graduate Course Description
92
Undergraduate Course Descriptions
54
degrees
Bachelor of Arts in Biblical Studies (BABS)
45
Master of Arts in Theological Studies (MATS)
74
Master of Divinity (M.Div)
81
faculty
Full-time Faculty
114
Part-time Faculty
115
financial information
General Fee
22
Payment
22
Refunds
23
Scholarships
25
Tuition and Fees
23
Graduation
General Graduation Policy
43
HTU Organization
Recognition and Affiliation
17
History
12
HTU Personnel
Administrative Personnel
112
Board of Directors
112
Faculty
114
HTU Philosophy
Institutional Goals
10
Mission Statement
9

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In
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HTU Policies
Academic Integrity and Misconduct
36
Attendance Policy
41
Chapel Policies
29
Drug-free Campus
26
Ethical Standards
10
General Admissions Policies
19
General Graduation Policy
43
Grievance Policy
38
Health Care Policy
34
Sexual Harassment Policy
27
Statement of Non-discrimination
20
Students with Disabilities
35
Weapons
28
HTU Property
Facilities
15
Location
14
student
Academic Assessment System
40
Admissions
19
Chapel Services
29
Financial Information
22
Registration
39
Student Life
26
Transfer Students
21
Withdrawal or Leave of Absence
41